Net Metering in Indiana

Net Metering

Last Updated November 24, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Indiana

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Start Date:

      09/01/2004

    • Utilities:

      Indianapolis Power & Light Co, Indiana Michigan Power Co, Northern Indiana Pub Serv Co, Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Multifamily Residential, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      1 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      1% of utility’s most recent peak summer load

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill as a kWh credit (i.e., at retail rate); carries over indefinitely

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted rules for net metering in September 2004, requiring the state’s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to offer net metering to all electric customers.

Eligible Resources and System Size

Facilities with a maximum capacity of 1 megawatt (MW) are eligible for net metering. Eligible net metering energy resources include wind, solar, hydro, fuel cells, hydrogen, organic waste biomass and dedicated crops powered generation.

Aggregate Cap

A utility may limit the aggregate amount of net-metering nameplate capacity to 1% of its most recent summer peak load.  Nameplate capacity for inverter-based net metering facilities is defined as “the aggregate output rating of all inverters in the facility, measured in kW.” At least 40% of a utility’s net metering capacity must be residential customers.

IOUs may choose to offer larger net metering capacity limits.

Net Excess Generation (NEG)

NEG during a billing period is credited to the customer’s next monthly bill in the form of a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit at the retail rate. NEG credits rollover indefinitely. If a customer elects to cease net metering, any unused credit will revert to the utility.

Interconnection

An interconnection agreement between the utility and the customer must be executed before the facility may be interconnected. Net-metered systems must comply with Indiana’s interconnection standards (170 IAC 4-4.3).

Metering

Either a single meter or a dual-meter arrangement may be used. Utilities may not charge customers any fees for additional metering for single-phase configurations installed by the utility, for customers’ requests to net meter, or for an initial net-metering facility inspection.

Insurance

Net metering customers must maintain homeowners, commercial, or other insurance providing coverage of at least $100,000 against loss arising out of the use of a net metered facility. Utilities may not require additional liability insurance in excess of this limit.

Reporting

The IURC’s 2014 net metering report is available here.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      9/8/2004

    • Effective Date:
      10/22/2004

    • Date Enacted:
      05/11/2011

    • Effective Date:
      07/13/2011

Contact

  • Organization:

    Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission

  • Address:

    101 West Washington Street, Suite 1500E
    Indianapolis, IN 46204

  • Phone:

    (317) 232-2304

  • E-Mail:

Memos

Loading…

    • 11/24/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      Annual review; no changes to policy; edited entry for clarity

  • 05/13/2015 by Heather Calderwood

    No changes to program policy.

Net Metering for Ohio

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated January 11, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Ohio

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Microturbines

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      No capacity limit specified, but system must be sized primarily to offset part or all of customer’s electricity requirements.

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified.

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at unbundled generation rate; customer may request payment for excess at end of 12-month billing period

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Note: In December of 2015, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) proposed new net metering rules in docket (Case 12-2050-EL-ORD). These rules are currently under review.

Ohio’s net-metering law requires electric distribution utilities to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using wind energy, solar energy, biomass, landfill gas, hydropower, fuel cells, or microturbines. Although there is no stated capacity limit on an individual net-metered energy system in Ohio, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) has ruled that “an implied limitation” is in effect because, by statute, a net-metered system must be “intended to offset part or all of the customer-generator’s electricity requirements.” Net-metered customers are required to use a single meter capable of recording flow of electricity in each direction. Net-metered customers may request refunds of net excess generation (NEG) credits accumulated over a 12-month period.

The electric distribution utilities and competitive retail electric service providers are required to develop a separate net metering tariff for hospital facilities. Qualifying hospital customer generators are not limited to the same energy generation technologies or system size restrictions described above for non-hospital net-metered customers. Two meters or a single meter with two registers capable of separately measuring flow of electricity in both directions are required for hospital net metering. All electricity generated by the hospital (including that generation used directly by the hospital and that which is sent back to the utility) will be credited at the market value at the time of generation. Electricity flowing from the utility and used by the hospital will be charged at the same rates as normal, as if the hospital were not net metering. The monthly bill will calculate the net of this total hospital customer generation vs. utility provided electricity to determine the bill. Any net credit dollar amount will be used against the hospital’s bill until the hospital requests a refund for any accumulated credits over a 12-month period.

Net-metered systems must meet safety standards specified by the National Electrical Code (NEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Utilities may not require customer-generators to comply with additional safety and performance standards.

History
Ohio’s original net-metering law was enacted in 1999 as part of the state’s electric-industry restructuring legislation. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) later revised its net metering rules in March 2007, prompted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). Initially, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) required utilities to credit customer net excess generation (NEG) at the utility’s full retail rate. However, in June 2002, the Ohio Supreme Court decided that this exchange was illegal (Case No. 01-0573) and ruled that each utility must credit NEG to the customer at the utility’s unbundled generation rate. Legislation enacted in May 2008 (S.B. 221) further amended Ohio’s net metering law by: (1)a limit on net metering to any time that the total rated generating capacity used by customer-generators is less than one percent of the provider’s aggregate customer peak demand in the state; and (2) removing all limitations related to energy generation technology and system size on systems sited at hospitals.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      07/06/1999

    • Effective Date:
      10/5/1999 (subsequently amended)

    • Date Enacted:
      04/06/2000

    • Effective Date:
      09/18/2000 (subsequently amended)

    • Date Enacted:
      04/06/2000

    • Effective Date:
      09/18/2000 (subsequently amended)

    • Date Enacted:
      11/5/2008

    • Effective Date:
      06/29/2009

Contact

Net Metering for Kansas

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated August 12, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Kansas

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      Before July 1, 2014: 200 kW for non-residential and schools; 25 kW for residential
      on or after July 1, 2014: 100 kW for non-residential; 15 kW for residential; 150 kW for schools

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      1% of utility’s retail peak demand during previous year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at the retail rate if system began operating before July 1, 2014 and at the average cost rate if system began operating on or after July 1, 2014; NEG expires on March 31 each year

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      The estimated generating capacity of all net-metered facilities counts toward the affected utility’s compliance with Kansas’s RPS. If a generator’s capacity is being utilized towards a utility’s RPS compliance, neither the utility nor the customer-generator may sell any associated RECs.

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not specified

Summary

Kansas adopted the Net Metering and Easy Connection Act in May 2009, which established net metering for customers of investor-owned utilities (IOUs).

Eligible Technologies

The following renewable energy resources are eligible for net metering: solar, wind, methane, biomass, hydro, and fuel cells that use hydrogen produced by one of these resources.

Eligibility and Availability

All IOUs in Kansas—Westar, Kansas City Power & Light, and the Empire Power District—are required to offer net metering, and some electric cooperatives have voluntarily created net metering provisions for their customers. IOUs are required to offer net metering on a first-come, first-served basis until the rated generating capacity of all net-metered systems equals 1% of the utility’s peak demand during the previous year.

Eligible systems in operation prior to July 1, 2014, must have a rated capacity of:

  • 25 kW or less for residential customers and
  • 200 kW or less for non-residential customers.

Eligible systems in operation on or after July 1, 2014, must have a rated capacity of:

  • 15 kW or less for residential customers,
  • 100 kW or less for non-residential customers, and
  • 150 kW for any postsecondary educational institution or any public or private school which provides instruction for students enrolled in grade kindergarten or grades one through 12.

IOUs must provide net-metered customers with a bi-directional meter at no cost to the customer. IOUs are prohibited from charging net-metered customers any additional standby charges, capacity charges, interconnection charges or other fees that a customer would not incur if the customer did not participate in net metering if the customer began operating a renewable energy resource under an interconnect agreement with a utility prior to July 1, 2014. IOUs may propose (through a rate proceeding) an alternative rate structure for customer-generators who begin operating a renewable energy system on or after July 1, 2014. This includes a time-of-use rate, minimum bill, or another rate structure for these customers.

The estimated generating capacity of all net-metered systems may count towards the utility’s renewable capacity target under Kansas’s voluntary renewable portfolio standard (RPS) goal, with each kilowatt (kW) of nameplate capacity that is net metered counting as 1.10 kW toward a utility’s compliance with the RPS. Net-metered renewable energy used for RPS compliance may not be used to generate renewable energy credits.

Net Excess Generation

If a customer-generator produces more electricity than is consumed during a monthly billing period, the net excess generation (NEG) will be credited to the customer-generator at one of two types of rates, depending on when the renewable energy resource began operating:

  • For renewable energy resources that began operating before July 1, 2014, all NEG, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), is carried forward from month-to-month and credited at a ratio of one-to-one against the customer-generator’s energy consumption, expressed in kWh, in subsequent months. This credit is equivalent to a retail rate of electricity.
  • For renewable energy resources that began operating on or after July 1, 2014, all NEG remaining in the customer-generator’s account at the end of each billing period is credited to the customer at a rate of 100% of the utility’s monthly system average cost of energy per kWh.

Beginning on January 1, 2030, all NEG will be carried forward at the utility’s monthly system average cost of energy per kWh, regardless of when the customer began operating the renewable energy resource. NEG remaining in the customer’s account expires on March 31 of each year.

Parallel Generation (Alternative to Net Metering)

Customer-generators in Kansas can choose to interconnect under a parallel generation contract with utilities instead of net metering (K.S.A. 66-1184). Utilities that provide retail electric services in Kansas—including IOUs, electric cooperatives (defined by K.S.A. 17-4603), non-stock member-owned electric cooperative corporations, and municipally-owned or operated utilities—are required to enter into a parallel generation contract with eligible customer-generators if requested in writing.

Under a parallel generation contract between a utility and a generator with a capacity of 200 kW or less, electricity exported by the customer-generator to the utility is sold at a rate of 150% of the utility’s monthly system average cost of energy per kWh, and any electricity imported by the customer-generator from the utility is purchased at the retail rate. Unlike net metering, electricity generation and consumption are time-sensitive and there is no “banking”. A utility may credit the customer’s account or pay the customer at least annually or when the total compensation due equals $25 or more.

System capacity limitations for entering into a parallel generation contract are 25 kW for residential customers, 200 kW for commercial customers, and 1.5 MW for Cloud county community college and Dodge City community college. A utility not obligated to purchase an amount greater than 4% of its peak power requirements.

Resources

More information on utility net metering policies and interconnection guidelines are available in the following riders:

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      5/22/2009

    • Effective Date:
      7/1/2009

    • Date Enacted:
      7/9/2010

Contact

  • Organization:

    Kansas Corporation Commission

  • Address:

    1500 SW Arrowhead Road
    Topeka, KS 66604-4027

  • Phone:

    (785) 271-3170

Memos

Loading…

  • 08/12/2015 by Ben Inskeep

    Annual review; no substantive change to policy

Net Metering in Illinois

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated January 25, 2017

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Illinois

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Start Date:

      04/01/2008

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Microturbines

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities, alternative retail electric suppliers

    • System Capacity Limit:

      2 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      5% of utility’s peak demand in previous year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Non-competitive customers: Credited to customer’s next bill as a kWh credit at the retail rate; granted to utility at end of a 12-month billing cycle
      Competitive customers: Credited to customer’s next bill as a kWh credit at electricity provider’s avoided cost of electricity supply over the monthly period

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer owns RECs

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Electricity providers must allow net metering for meter-aggregated customers within a single building as well as community-owned renewable projects.

Summary

Note: The legislation passed in December 2016 did not change the basic net metering rules; the 5% aggregate cap remains in place and a new compensation process will be developed when the cap is reached (a net billing process is the default). Community solar and meter aggregation were made eligible for net metering under the terms of the legislation; the language in previous law allowing utilities to “consider” whether to allow net metering to meter aggregation and community solar customers was removed and replaced with specific terms under which net metering must be allowed.

Illinois enacted S.B. 680 in August 2007, requiring investor-owned utilities and alternative retail electric suppliers in Illinois to offer net metering. Municipal utilities and electric cooperatives are not required to offer net metering.

For customers in competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, the law prescribes a dual metering and bill crediting system, which does not meet the definition of net metering as the term is generally defined. Customers in non-competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, are eligible for net metering; this includes all residential customers and non-residential customers with electric loads of up to 100 kW in the ComEd service territory and up to 150 kW in the Ameren utilities service territory.

Eligible Technologies 

In Illinois, net metering is available to electric customers that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, dedicated energy crops, anaerobic digestion of livestock or food processing waste, hydropower, fuel cells and microturbines powered by renewable fuels, agricultural residues, untreated and unadulterated wood waste, landscape trimmings, and livestock manure.

System Size

Systems up to 2 megawatts (MW) in capacity that are intended primarily to offset the customer’s own electrical requirements are eligible for net metering.

Aggregate Cap

Each investor-owned utility and retail supplier must provide net metering and dual metering until the load of its net-metering customers and dual-metering customers equals 5% of the total peak demand supplied by the utility during the previous year.

Metering Equipment

For eligible customers whose electric service has not been declared competitive as of July 1, 2011, and whose electric delivery service is provided and measured on a kilowatt-hour (kWh) basis and electric supply service is not provided based on hourly pricing, net metering is accomplished through use of a single, bi-directional meter. The electricity provider must arrange for the local electric utility or a meter service provider to install and maintain a new revenue meter at the electricity provider’s expense.

For eligible customers whose electric service has not been declared competitive as of July 1, 2011 and whose electric delivery service is provided and measured on a kilowatt (kW) demand basis and electric supply service is not provided based on hourly pricing, net metering is accomplished through the use of a dual channel meter. Customers must pay for the costs of installing necessary metering equipment.

For all other eligible customers, the electricity provider may arrange for the local electric utility or a meter service provider to install and maintain metering equipment capable of measuring the flow of electricity both into and out of the customer’s facility at the same rate and ratio, typically through the use of a dual channel meter. If the eligible customer’s existing electric revenue meter does not meet this requirement, then the costs of installing the equipment is paid for by the customer.

Net Excess Generation 

For eligible customers whose electric service has not been declared competitive as of July 1, 2011, and whose electric delivery service is provided and measured on a kWh basis and electric supply service is not provided based on hourly pricing, any net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried over as a kWh credit (at the retail rate) to the following billing period. At the end of an annualized period, any remaining NEG credits in the customer’s account expire. Customers may select an annualized period that ends with last day of either their April or October billing period for this purpose.

For eligible customers whose electric service has not been declared competitive as of July 1, 2011, and whose electric delivery service is provided and measured on a kWh basis and electric supply service is provided based on hourly pricing, any NEG during a billing period is carried over as a kWh credit that consists of an energy credit and a delivery service credit. The energy credit is valued at the same price per kWh as the electric service provider would charge for kWh energy sales during that same hourly period. The delivery credit is equal to the net kWh produced in such hourly period times a credit that reflects all kWh-based charges in the customer’s electric service rate, excluding energy charges.

For eligible customers whose electric service has not been declared competitive as of July 1, 2011, and whose electric delivery service is provided and measured on a kW demand basis and electric supply service is not provided based on hourly pricing, any NEG during a billing period is carried over as a 1:1 kWh credit that reflects the kWh-based charges in the customer’s electric service rate.

For all other eligible customers, any NEG during a billing period is compensated at the electricity provider’s avoided cost of electricity supply over the monthly period.

Renewable Energy Credits

All net metering customers (and dual-metering customers) hold ownership and title to all renewable energy credits (RECs) and greenhouse-gas credits associated with customer generation.

Meter Aggregation and Community Net Metering

The Illinois net metering statute requires electricity providers to “consider” whether to allow meter aggregation for the purpose of net metering. For the purposes of this section, “meter aggregation” would allow multiple customers to effectively net meter their utility bills on a pro-rata basis for shared renewable energy facilities. (Note: This type of arrangement is called “virtual net metering” or “neighborhood net metering” in other states.) Electric providers may choose to offer meter aggregation for community-owned wind, biomass, solar, or methane digesters, or other situations where multiple individual customers are served by the same renewable generating facility. No electric provider has elected to do so as of November 2015. Legislation passed in December 2016 changed this rule; electricity providers now must allow net metering for the customers mentioned above provided the facility has a nameplate capacity of no more than 2,000 kW.

Certification Requirement

All net-metered systems are required to be installed by a certified contractor.

Non-discriminatory Rates Requirement

An electricity provider is required to provide electric service to eligible customers who utilize net metering at non-discriminatory rates that are identical, with respect to rate structure, retail rate components, and any monthly charges, to the rates that the customer would be charged if not a net metering customer. An electricity provider is not permitted to charge net metering customers any fee or charge or require additional equipment, insurance, or any other requirements not specifically authorized by interconnection standards authorized by the ICC, unless the fee, charge, or other requirement would apply to other similarly situated customers who are not net metering customers.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      08/24/2007

    • Effective Date:
      08/24/2007

    • Effective Date:
      05/15/2008

    • Date Enacted:
      12/07/2016

    • Effective Date:
      01/01/2017

Contact

Memos

Loading…

    • 01/25/2017 by David Sarkisian

      Added note explaining changes to net metering/community solar and meter aggregation rules made in SB 2814 (December 2016 legislation).

    • 01/13/2017 by David Sarkisian

      Added note on impact of December 2016 legislation.

    • 12/01/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      Clarified the definition of customers in competitive vs. non-competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, and deleted an old reference to a previous system size limitation of 40 kW; the current system size limitation for net metering facilities is 2 megawatts.

    • 11/20/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      Updated note to reflect proposed rulemaking; updated entry content to fully reflect statutes enacted in 2012-2013

  • 06/26/2015 by Heather Calderwood

    No changes to policy.

Net Metering in Iowa

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated June 18, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Iowa

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Start Date:

      07/01/1984

    • Utilities:

      Interstate Power and Light Co, MidAmerican Energy Co

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      500 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; carries over indefinitely; excess credits cannot be cashed out

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed; meter aggregation and virtual net metering are not generally available to customers

Summary

Note: In January 2014, the Iowa Utilities Board issued an order commencing an inquiry on distributed generation and interconnection issues under Docket No. NOI-2014-0001. Details will be posted here if the inquiry results in any changes to Iowa’s net metering policy.

Iowa’s statutes do not explicitly authorize the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) to mandate net metering, but this authority is implicit through the board’s enforcement of PURPA and Iowa Code § 476.41 et seq. Iowa’s net-metering subrule, adopted by the IUB in July 1984, applies to customers that generate electricity using alternate energy production facilities (AEPs).

Eligibility and Availability

Net metering is available to customers of Iowa’s two investor-owned utilities, MidAmerican Energy and Interstate Power and Light (IPL). MidAmerican Energy’s net metering tariff is available here, and IPL’s tariff is available here.

There is no explicit limit on either the size of a net-metered system or on total enrollment in the IUB’s subrule. However, separate rule waivers have allowed MidAmerican Energy and IPL to limit individual systems to 500 kilowatts (kW). Customers that have an on-site renewable energy system through an existing third-party power purchase agreement are not eligible for net metering under the existing net metering tariffs of MidAmerican and IPL. IPL also limits net metering to customers on the Residential, Farm, or General Service rate schedules, so customers on the Large General Service rate schedule (i.e., customers using more than 20,000 kWh per month) are ineligible to net meter.

According to the IUB, net metering is available to approximately 89% of residential customers in Iowa (see Docket No. NOI-2014-0001, “Order Soliciting Additional Comments and Scheduling Workshop,” p. 6). The IUB has so far declined to assert jurisdiction over net metering policies for non-rate-regulated utilities (i.e., electric cooperatives and municipal utilities), but strongly encourages them to adopt net metering policies on a voluntary basis.

Net Excess Generation

Although Iowa’s net-metering subrule requires utilities to purchase a customer’s net excess generation (NEG) at the utility’s avoided cost rate, subsequent rule waivers allow MidAmerican Energy and IPL customers to carry NEG forward for use in future months as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit. The net metering kWh offset effectively provides a credit at the customer’s retail electricity rate; however, MidAmerican and IPL customers cannot cash out any excess credits.

Interconnection

An overview of Iowa’s interconnection guidelines can be found here.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      07/27/1984

Contact

Memos

Loading…

    • 06/18/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      Updated summary to indicate that net metering is not widely available for systems where a customer purchases the system’s electricity output through a power purchase agreement with a third party.

  • 06/05/2015 by Ben Inskeep

    Annual review. The net metering policy is currently being reviewed by the Iowa Utilities Board.

Net Metering in Nebraska

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated June 23, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Nebraska

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      25 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      1% of utility’s average monthly peak demand

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at avoided-cost rate; excess reconciled annually at avoided-cost rate

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer owns RECs

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not allowed

Summary

In May 2009 Nebraska established statewide interconnection and net metering rules for all electric utilities in Nebraska (see L.B. 436).

Eligibility and Availability

Utilities are required to provide interconnection and net metering for a customer-generator’s “qualified facility,” which generates electricity from an energy source of solar, methane, wind, biomass, hydropower, or geothermal and has a rated capacity at or below 25 kilowatts (kW). Utilities are required to offer net metering until the aggregate generating capacity of all customer-generators equals 1% of the utility’s average monthly peak demand for that year. A utility may enter into other arrangements with customers desiring to install electric generating equipment and may also provide net metering to customer-generators having renewable generation units with a rated capacity above 25 kW.

For example, Lincoln Electric Systems (LES) allows owners of qualifying facilities that have a production capacity limit of 100 kW or less to either sell the entire electrical output of qualifying facilities to LES or use the electrical output of qualifying facilities to instantaneously supply all or a portion of their own load and sell the instantaneous surplus, if any, to LES.

Customer-generators retain all renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the electricity their system generates.

Net Excess Generation

Any net excess generation (NEG) produced by the qualifying facility during the month will be credited at the utility’s avoided cost rate for that month and carried forward to the next billing period. Any credited NEG remaining at the end of an annualized period will be paid out to the customer-generator.

Consumer may be billed for the non-energy charges (including but not limited to the basic service, demand, and minimum billing charges) as set forth in the applicable standard rate schedule.

Resources

More information on utility net metering policies can be found at the following websites:

For utilities not listed here, please contact them directly for specific policies and procedures.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      5/13/2009

    • Effective Date:
      5/13/2009

Contact

Net Metering in Missouri

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated April 14, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Missouri

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Hydroelectric, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-Owned Utilities, Municipal Utilities, and Electric Cooperatives

    • System Capacity Limit:

      100 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      Total cap: 5% of utility’s single-hour peak load during previous year
      Annual cap: 1% of a utility’s single-hour peak load for the previous calendar year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at avoided-cost rate; credits expire after 12 months or upon termination of customer’s utility service or net metering relationship.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer-generator (transferred to utility in some cases where customer-generator receives a rebate)

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Eligibility and Availability

Missouri enacted legislation in June 2007 requiring all electric utilities—investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electric cooperatives—to offer net metering to customers with systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using wind energy, solar-thermal energy, hydroelectric energy, photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells using hydrogen produced by one of the aforementioned resources, and other sources of energy certified as renewable by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Systems must be intended primarily to offset part or all of a customer’s own electricity requirements, and must be located on premises owned, operated, leased or otherwise controlled by the customer.

Net metering is available until the total rated generating capacity of net-metered systems equals 5% of a utility’s single-hour peak load during the previous year. In a calendar year the aggregate capacity of all approved applications for interconnection is limited to 1% of a utility’s single-hour peak load for the previous calendar year. The estimated generating capacity of all net-metered systems counts towards the respective utility’s fulfillment of its requirements under Missouri’s renewable portfolio standard.

If a customer’s existing metering equipment is not capable of measuring the net amount of electricity produced or consumed, or if it is necessary for the utility to install “additional distribution equipment to accommodate the customer-generator’s facility,” then the customer must pay for these costs.

Net Excess Generation

Customer net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is credited to the customer’s next bill at a rate at least equivalent the utility’s avoided cost rate. Credits expire 12 months after issuance without compensation.

Utilities must offer a net-metering tariff or contract that is identical in electrical energy rates, rate structure, and monthly charges to the contract or tariff that the customer would be assigned if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator. The tariff or contract cannot charge the customer-generator any additional standby, capacity, interconnection, or other fee or charge that would not otherwise be charged if the customer were not an eligible customer-generator.

Interconnection

For systems of 10 kW or less, applications must include an all-in-one document that includes a simple interconnection request, simple procedures, and a brief set of terms and condition.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      06/25/2007

    • Effective Date:
      01/01/2008

    • Date Enacted:
      10/23/2008

    • Effective Date:
      02/28/2009 (subsequently amended)

Contact

  • Organization:

    Missouri Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    P.O. Box 360
    Jefferson City, MO 65102

  • Phone:

    (573) 751-7522

  • E-Mail:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the cost per kW of CWC’s turbines compared to conventional power technology?

The CWC 36kW cost is $2013 per kW of power production capacity. According to the AWEA, the average cost for electricity production capacity in the USA is $6096 per kW —- 303% higher.

Who is CWC’s competition?

We are aware of 334 companies in the small wind turbine space. Most of them only produce very small turbines (under 10kW).  None of them price their electricity production capacity anywhere as low as Change Wind’s price ($2013 per kW,  i.e. $72,440 per turbine).

Is the CWC 36kW competitive with 3-blade horizontal axis turbines? 

Yes, very much so.  On a cost per kW basis, the CWC 36kW sells for 72% below the competition in small and medium turbines.  It pruduces electricity using turbulent air only 10 meters over the surface, cutting in at just 6 mph, and reaching optimal efficiency at 12 mph.  Since it captures wind from any direction it does not have to be mechanically turned into the wind direction.

Are there any service issues I should be concerned about?

The CWC 36kW comes with a 10 year warranty which can be extended an additional 10 years as long as the annual maintenance has been carried out. The turbine needs an inspection, oil change, lubrication, electronics check, and power wash every 100,000 kWh, approximately once each year, costing roughly $500 in most areas.

How is Change Wind able to price its turbines so low?  

Change Wind passes along to customers the benefit of high efficiency and low cost manufacturing.   Production is performed at a re-purposed New England wire factory building obtained at below market cost, with on-site hydro-electric power at 66% below market cost.  The company uses state-of-the-art CNC and robotic machinery, extracting its craftsmanship from the sophisticated machinery and tools, not from expensive workmen.

 

Are there tax incentives for on-site wind systems?

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, H.R. 1424, was enacted into law.  It includes a federal-level investment tax credit to help consumers purchase wind turbines for home, farm, or business use.  Owners of systems with 100 kW of capacity or less can receive a credit of 30% of the installed cost of the system.  It is available for equipment installed through December 31, 2016.  Source: http://energytaxincentives.org/business/renewables.php.