Net Metering in Oklahoma

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated December 15, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Oklahoma

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities, regulated electric cooperatives

    • System Capacity Limit:

      100 kW or less; 25,000 kWh/year or less

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Utilities and regulated electric cooperatives are not required to purchase monthly net excess generation from customers.

Summary

Note: In April 2014 Oklahoma’s governor signed S.B. 1456, allowing utilities and regulated electric cooperatives to apply to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission for approval to apply a fixed charge to customer-generators who install net-metered distributed generation on or after November 1, 2014.

Eligibility and Availability

In 1988 the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) adopted terms and conditions of purchase that govern the supplying and delivering of power to a cooperative/utility’s electric system by a small power producer or cogenerator (as the terms are respectively defined under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) of 100 kilowatts or less.

Under the adopted rules, net metering is available to all customer classes. There is no limit on the amount of aggregate net-metered capacity, and utilities are not allowed to require new liability insurance as a condition for interconnection.

Net Excess Generation

Utilities and regulated electric cooperatives are not required to purchase monthly net excess generation (NEG) from customers. A customer-generator’s NEG must be provided to the electric cooperative or utility at no charge.

Under provisions in S.B. 1456 utilities are allowed to apply to the OCC for permission to apply a fixed charge to customer-generators who install net-metered distributed generation on or after November 1, 2014. Previously, utilities had not been allowed to impose extra charges for customers signed up for net metering. The accompanying Executive Order 2014-07 clarified that S.B. 1456 does not mandate increased charges for distributed generation customer-generators and directed the OCC to consider alternative rate reforms such as time-of-use, minimum bills, and demand charges before allowing the implementation of a fixed charge for net-metered systems.

Click here for a list of cooperative utilities exempt from OCC regulation.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      5/23/1988

    • Date Enacted:
      04/21/2014

    • Effective Date:
      11/01/2014

    • Date Enacted:
      04/21/2014

    • Effective Date:
      04/21/2014

Contact

Memos

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  • 12/15/2015 by David Sarkisian

    Annual review; no policy changes

Net Metering in Arizona

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated December 21, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Arizona

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Start Date:

      05/23/2009

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional, Senior citizens

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives

    • System Capacity Limit:

      No capacity limit specified, but system must be sized to meet part or all of customer’s electric load and may not exceed 125% of customer’s total connected load

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; excess reconciled annually at avoided-cost rate

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed in net metering rules; customer owns RECs unless participating in a utility incentive

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Eligibility and Availability

Net metering is available to investor-owned utility and electric cooperative customers who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power, or fuel cell technologies.* A net metering facility must be located on the customer’s premises.

System Capacity Limit

The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) has not set a firm kilowatt (kW)-based limit on system size capacity; instead, systems must be sized to not exceed 125% of the customer’s total connected load. If there is no available load data for the customer, the generating system may not exceed the customer’s electric service drop capacity.

Aggregate Capacity Limit

The ACC has not set an aggregate capacity limit for all net-metered systems in a utility’s territory. The utility must instead demonstrate to the ACC why such a cap should be allowed. Under the ACC rules, each utility must file an annual report listing the net metered facilities and their installed capacity for the previous calendar year.

Net Excess Generation

Net metering is accomplished using a single bi-directional meter. Any customer net excess generation (NEG) will be carried over to the customer’s next bill at the utility’s retail rate, as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit. Any NEG remaining at the customer’s last monthly bill in the annual true-up period will be paid to the customer, via check or billing credit, at the utility’s avoided cost payment.

For customers taking service under a time-of-use rate, off-peak generation will be credited against off-peak consumption, and on-peak generation will be credited against on-peak consumption. The customer’s monthly bill is based on the net on-peak kWh and net off-peak kWh amounts. Any monthly customer NEG will be carried over to the customer’s next bill as an off-peak or on-peak kWh credit.

Additional Charges

The ACC requires that net metering charges be assessed on a non-discriminatory basis. Any new or additional charges that would increase an eligible customer-generator’s costs beyond those of other customers in the rate class to which the eligible customer-generator would otherwise be assigned must be proposed to the ACC for consideration and approval. The utility has the burden of proof in any such proposal.

In December 2013, in response to an application from the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) to address cost shifting, the ACC ordered a $0.70 per kW charge for all residential distributed generation systems installed on or after January 1, 2014.** The charge does not apply to customers with systems installed by December 31, 2013. APS is required to file quarterly reports with the number of new distributed generation installations per month, the size of those installations in kW, and the revenue collected from customers through the lost fixed cost recovery charge. The ACC’s decision may be found here. Other utilities have also proposed additional charges for customer-generators.

*Salt River Project and municipal utilities do not fall under the jurisdiction of the Arizona Corporation Commission, and are therefore not subject to the state net metering rules.

**The charge applies specifically to “distributed generation” systems, not “net-metered systems”. However, as net metering only applies to systems located on the customer’s premises, the charge will affect net metering customers. The charge only applies to APS customers. 

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      10/16/2008

    • Effective Date:
      5/1/2009

    • Date Enacted:
      12/03/2013
    • Effective Date:
      01/01/2014

Contact

  • Organization:

    Arizona Corporation Commission

  • Address:

    1200 W. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85007

  • Phone:

    (602) 542-0853

  • E-Mail:

Memos

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  • 12/21/2015 by Autumn Proudlove

    Annual review; no policy changes. The ACC has scheduled an evidentiary hearing for April 2016 to investigate the cost of serving customers with distributed generation, as well as the value provided by distributed generation.

Net Metering in New Mexico

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated May 31, 2017

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      New Mexico

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Microturbines

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives

    • System Capacity Limit:

      80 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Either credited to customer’s next bill at avoided cost rate or excess kWh generated are credited to the account and rolled over indefinitely (equivalent to retail rate) (e.g., available to PNM customers). If customer leaves the utility, unused credits are paid out at the avoided cost rate.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer-generator owns the RECs

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Eligibility and Availability

Net metering is available to all “qualifying facilities” (QFs), as defined by the federal Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), which pertains to renewable energy systems and combined heat and power systems up to 80 megawatts (MW) in capacity. There is no statewide cap on the aggregate capacity of net-metered systems.

All utilities subject to Public Regulation Commission (PRC) jurisdiction must offer net metering. (Municipal utilities, which are not regulated by the PRC, are exempt.) Customers are required to be billed for service in accordance with the rate structure and monthly charges that the customer would be assigned if the customer had not interconnected a QF.

Net Excess Generation

For net-metered systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or less, the utility has a choice in how to compensate customers for net excess generation (NEG). The utility may credit the customer on the next bill for the excess kilowatt-hours (kWh) generated, by either:

  • Crediting or paying the customer for the NEG supplied to the utility at the utility’s energy rate (i.e., avoided cost rate); or,
  • Crediting the customer for the kWh of NEG supplied to the utility. Unused credits are carried forward from month-to-month, provided that if a utility opts to credit customers and the customer leaves the system, the customer’s unused credits for excess kWh generated are paid to the customer at the utility’s energy rate.

Utility-specific information on net metering can be found at the following websites:

For all other net-metered systems up to 80 MW, the NEG delivered from the QF to the utility is purchased by the utility at the utility’s applicable time-of-use or single period energy rate. If a customer has NEG totaling less than $50 during a monthly billing period, the excess is carried over to the customer’s next monthly bill. If NEG exceeds $50 during a monthly billing period, the utility will pay the customer the following month for the excess.

The energy rate to be paid for the energy supplied by the QF in any month shall be the respective month’s rate from the utility’s current schedule on file with the PRC. Each utility shall file with the PRC its schedule containing monthly energy rates that will be applicable to the next twelve-month period. Each month’s energy rate contained in the schedule is the average of the economy energy purchases by the utility for the corresponding month of the immediately preceding 12-month period. The energy rate contained in the schedules is required to include the savings attributable to the avoidance of losses due to transmission, distribution, and transformation as applicable for different voltage levels of interconnection.

Utilities with retail time-of-use rates on file with the PRC must file schedules reflecting monthly energy rates calculated for peak periods only and off-peak periods only which shall be applied to QFs whose generation is limited to peak periods only or off-peak periods only.

Interconnection

The PRC adopted revised interconnection standards for customer-sited generators in July 2008.

If provision of the net metering option requires metering equipment and related facilities that are more costly than would otherwise be necessary absent the requirement for net metering, the QF must pay all incremental costs associated with installing the more costly metering equipment and facilities.

The QF must give the utility at least 60 days written advance notice to interconnect, and the utility must specify within 15 days the reason(s) why it cannot interconnect as requested if it is unable to do so. Within 10 days of receiving notification of the intent to interconnect from a customer with a QF 10 kW or less in size, the utility must notify the customer of any metering costs.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      7/29/2008

    • Effective Date:
      7/29/2008

Contact

Net Metering in North Carolina

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated September 19, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      North Carolina

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Tribal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      1 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; granted to utility at beginning of summer billing season

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Utility owns RECs (unless customer chooses to net meter under a time of use tariff with demand charges)

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) established net metering rules for the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power — in 2005. The NCUC subsequently amended the rules, most recently in 2009.

Eligibility and Availability 

Net metering is available to all customers who own and operate systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, ocean or wave energy, biomass resources, combined heat and power (CHP) which uses waste heat derived from eligible renewable resources, or hydrogen derived from eligible renewable resources.* Customers may net meter under any available rate schedule. However, customers that choose to take service under any tariff other than a time-of-use demand (TOUD) tariff must surrender to the utility all renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the customer’s generation – with no compensation for the customer.

The individual system capacity limit is one megawatt (MW). There is no aggregate capacity limit on net-metered systems. For residential systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) and non-residential systems up to 100 kW in capacity, utilities may not charge any standby charges or any additional metering charges other than those charged to customers who do not net meter under the applicable rate schedule. For larger systems, utilities are allowed to impose standby charges consistent with approved standby rates applicable to other customer-owned generation.

Net Excess Generation

In general, any customer net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried forward to the following billing period at the utility’s full retail rate, and then surrendered to the utility – with no compensation for the customer – at the beginning of each summer billing season. However, the treatment of generation and NEG for customers on TOU-demand tariffs is more complicated. For these customers, on-peak generation is used to offset on-peak consumption, and off-peak generation is used to offset off-peak consumption. Any remaining on-peak generation is then used to offset off-peak consumption. Off-peak generation may only be used to offset off-peak consumption.

Utilities must file with the NCUC annual reports indicating the number of net-metering applicants and customer-generators, the aggregate capacity of net-metered generation, the size and types of renewable-energy systems, the amounts of on-peak and off-peak generation credited and ultimately granted to the utility, and the reasons for any rejections or removals of customer-generators from a net-metering arrangement.

* In July 2006, the NCUC extended net metering to eligible systems with battery storage. “Gaming” a net-metering arrangement by using battery storage to manipulate a TOU tariff is not allowed.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      10/20/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      12/27/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      7/6/2006

    • Date Enacted:
      03/31/2009

    • Effective Date:
      06/01/2009

Contact

Memos

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  • 09/19/2015 by Brian Lips

    No policy changes.

    Blue Ridge EMC – Net Metering

    Last Updated December 17, 2015

    Program Overview

      • Implementing Sector:

        Utility

      • Category:

        Regulatory Policy

      • State:

        North Carolina

      • Incentive Type:

        Net Metering

      • Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp

      • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

        Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

      • Applicable Sectors:

        Residential

      • Applicable Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation

      • System Capacity Limit:

        25 kilowatts

      • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

        None

      • Net Excess Generation:

        Net excess generation is credited at the retail rate. However, the retail rate for net metering customers is lower than the retail rate for general residential customers. Credits roll over month-to month until May 31 of each year, when remaining credit is granted to the utility without customer compensation.

      • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

        Utility owns RECs

      • Meter Aggregation:

        Not allowed

    Summary

    The Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation offers net metering to its residential customers with solar photovoltaic, wind, or micro-hydro generators up to 25 kilowatts. There is no aggregate capacity limit.

    Net excess generation is credited at retail rate. However, net metering customers are not served on the general residential rate tariff; net metering customers have a lower retail energy rate and higher basic facilities charge than general residential customers. Net metering customers also have a higher minimum bill than general residential customers. Excess credit rolls over month-to-month, but is granted to the utility without compensation on May 31 of each year.

    Authorities

      • Date Enacted:
        04/30/2015

      • Effective Date:
        05/04/2015

    Contact

    Memos

    Loading…

    • 12/17/2015 by Autumn Proudlove

      Created program entry.

Net Metering in Mississippi

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated July 12, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Mississippi

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Start Date:

      01/03/2016

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Investor-Owned Utility, Municipal Utilities, Residential, Cooperative Utilities, Agricultural, Multifamily Residential, Low Income Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All Investor Owned Electric Utilities, limited applicablity over cooperatives. Cooperatives served by TVA can opt out of state net metering rules if they participate in the TVA net metering program.

    • System Capacity Limit:

      Residential: 20kW (DC)
      Non-Residential: 2 MW (DC)

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      3% of the utility’s total system peak demand recorded during the prior calander year.

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Excess generation is sold to the utility at avoided cost plus DG benefits adder (2.5 c/kWh). The energy credit value is carried over indefinitely

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      RECs are transferred to the utility when the customer receives DG benefits adder when selling excess generation to the utility.

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not specified

Incentives

This program has 2 Incentives

    • Technologies:
      Geothermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion

    • Sectors:
      Residential, Low Income Residential

    • Parameters:
      The system size has a maximum of 20.00 kW-DC

    • Technologies:
      Geothermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion

    • Sectors:
      Commercial, Industrial, Agricultural

    • Parameters:
      The system size has a maximum of 2.00 MW

Summary

NOTE: Although, this post is categorized as netmetering, the policy adopted by MS does not meet DSIRE’s standards for a typical net metering policy. Net metering policy allows a customer to offset all of their electricity consumption on a 1:1 parity basis within the billing period. The policy adopted by MS only allows instantaneous generation and use to be credited at retail rate; all of the electricity exports are credited at the utility’s avoided cost plus a premium. 

On December 2015, the Mississippi Public Utilities Commission (PSC) through an extensive rulemaking process established a method to compensate and incentivize behind the meter electricity generation in the State. The rule requires all the investor owned electric utilities* in the state to allow their customers to own or lease distributed energy resources to offset their electricity use on site and any sell excess electricity to the utilities. Even though the PSC order defines the program as net-metering, the program only allows the netting of electricity use to occur at an instantaneous basis.  Any electricity exported to the grid will be not be used to ‘net’ the customers  monthly electricity use, instead it will be credited at the utility’s wholesale avoided cost rate plus an additional 2.5c/kWh premium, which both add up to less than the retail rate of electricity.

Eligibility

Any electric customer in the state, including industrial, large commercial, residential, or commercial customer are eligible to install behind the meter generation systems. The distributed energy system ‘systems’ must be powered through renewable energy sources, including solar, wind, geothermal, wave or tidal, hydro, and biomass. Residential systems are limited to 20KW and must be located on customer’s premises. Non-residential customers can aggregate generation systems within their premises up to 2 MW.

Systems are allowed to interconnect on a first-come, first-service basis until total systems add up to 3% of the utility’s total system peak demand recorded during its prior calendar year.

Program Description

The interconnected systems will include a bi-directional meter with two channels that can record both the excess electricity generated by the system (channel 2) and the net electricity supplied to the customer from the utility (channel 1). Channel 1 shall record the net of the total electricity produced by the system and the total customer’s electricity usage in real time. Electricity self supplied by the customer will be credited at full retail rate. Any generation of the system that is not used by the customer at that particular instant will be recorded in channel 2. This excess generation will be credited at utilities’ avoided cost plus additional “Non-quantifiable Expected Benefits Adder” of 2.5 c/kWh. This would value the excess generation at approximately 7 to 7.5c/kWh. All the excess generation at the end of the billing period will be converted to monetary credit, and be carried over to subsequent billing period indefinitely. This credit, however cannot be applied to reduce any fixed monthly charge or minimum bill component of the electric bill.

The “Non-quantifiable Expected Benefits Adder” of 2.5 c/kWh is set temporarily to recognize the additional value of distributed generation on the grid. This amount of the adder will be modified within 3 years based on the calculation of actual benefits of the distributed generation.

Renewable Energy Credits

The Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) represent the environmental attributes of electricity generated by renewable energy system. Generally, RECs remain with the customer, however, if the customer benefits from the “Non-quantifiable Expected Benefits Adder” (DG adder) while selling their excess generation to the utility, then the RECs are transferred to the utility.

Third Party Ownership

Third Party Ownership (TPO) model is allowed in the state. Under the TPO arrangement, the customer may contact a third party to build PV solar system and agree to make monthly lease payments for the use of that system. This definition of TPO offered by the PSC only includes leases, and does not include third party sales through a power purchasing agreement (PPA) that have been popular in other States.

Incentive for low income customers

The two largest investor owned utilities in the state Entergy Mississippi and Mississippi Power are required to offer additional 2c/kwh adder to the first 1,000 qualifying low income customers who wish to net meter. To be eligible for this added incentive, the customers must have household income at or below 200% of the federal poverty level, or similar requirement approved by the Commission. This adder will stay in place for 15 years from the date the customer begins the service.

*The PSC previously required all the electric utilities, including cooperatives in the state to provide net metering to its cooperative members. HB 1139 enacted in April 2016 provided that the PSC can require cooperatives to adopt net metering programs, but may not establish the level of compensation or credits for these programs. The South Mississippi Electric Power Association (SEMPA) member cooperatives may choose to adopt the state net metering law or can file their net metering and interconnection standards before the commission by October 3, 2016. These standards must be consistent with the net metering rule adopted by the state. Cooperatives that participate in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) can continue to participate in the TVA sponsored net metering program to satisfy the rule. 

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      12/03/2015

    • Effective Date:
      01/04/2016

    • Date Enacted:
      04/07/2016

    • Effective Date:
      07/01/2016

Contact

Memos

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  • 07/12/2016 by Achyut Shrestha

    H.B. 1139 enacted on April 2016 provides that the Public Service Commission (PSC) can require co-ops to adopt net metering or energy efficiency programs, but the PSC may not establish level of expenditures, compensation, or credits for these programs. The bill changes the recently adopted net metering regulation in the state that required all electric utilities including cooperatives in the state to offer net metering.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the cost per kW of CWC’s turbines compared to conventional power technology?

The CWC 36kW cost is $2013 per kW of power production capacity. According to the AWEA, the average cost for electricity production capacity in the USA is $6096 per kW —- 303% higher.

Who is CWC’s competition?

We are aware of 334 companies in the small wind turbine space. Most of them only produce very small turbines (under 10kW).  None of them price their electricity production capacity anywhere as low as Change Wind’s price ($2013 per kW,  i.e. $72,440 per turbine).

Is the CWC 36kW competitive with 3-blade horizontal axis turbines? 

Yes, very much so.  On a cost per kW basis, the CWC 36kW sells for 72% below the competition in small and medium turbines.  It pruduces electricity using turbulent air only 10 meters over the surface, cutting in at just 6 mph, and reaching optimal efficiency at 12 mph.  Since it captures wind from any direction it does not have to be mechanically turned into the wind direction.

Are there any service issues I should be concerned about?

The CWC 36kW comes with a 10 year warranty which can be extended an additional 10 years as long as the annual maintenance has been carried out. The turbine needs an inspection, oil change, lubrication, electronics check, and power wash every 100,000 kWh, approximately once each year, costing roughly $500 in most areas.

How is Change Wind able to price its turbines so low?  

Change Wind passes along to customers the benefit of high efficiency and low cost manufacturing.   Production is performed at a re-purposed New England wire factory building obtained at below market cost, with on-site hydro-electric power at 66% below market cost.  The company uses state-of-the-art CNC and robotic machinery, extracting its craftsmanship from the sophisticated machinery and tools, not from expensive workmen.

 

Are there tax incentives for on-site wind systems?

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, H.R. 1424, was enacted into law.  It includes a federal-level investment tax credit to help consumers purchase wind turbines for home, farm, or business use.  Owners of systems with 100 kW of capacity or less can receive a credit of 30% of the installed cost of the system.  It is available for equipment installed through December 31, 2016.  Source: http://energytaxincentives.org/business/renewables.php.