Net Metering in South Carolina

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated January 25, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      South Carolina

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Combined Heat & Power, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Investor-Owned Utility, Nonprofit, Municipal Utilities, Residential, Cooperative Utilities, Schools, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities with more than 100,00 customers, excluding cooperatives.

    • System Capacity Limit:

      20 kW for residential; 1000 kW for non-residential

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      2% of average retail peak demand for previous 5 years

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill on a monthly basis. Annual pay out to customer at the avoided cost rate zeros out monthly carry-over.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Explicitly prohibited

Summary

In April of 2014 the South Carolina legislature unanimously passed S.B. 1189 to create a voluntary Distributed Energy Resource Program. In March 2015 the Public Utilities Commission approved a settlement agreement among  solar stakeholders detailing how the new net metering mandates laid out in S.B. 1189 would be fulfilled.

The settlement agreement approved by the Public Service Commission stipulates that utilities will offer net energy metering at the full retail rate.. Additionally, no new charges or fees distinctly separate from new net metering rates will be imposed upon customer generators until the expiration of the agreement on January 1, 2021.

The settlement agreement also stipulates that utility-specific distributed energy resources net metering incentive (DER NEM incentive) will be applied to customer-generators receiving service under new net metering tariffs prior to January 1, 2021. Customer-generators whose net energy metering facilities were operational prior to the availability of net energy metering rates approved by the commission under the terms of the settlement agreement may remain in historic net energy metering programs through December 31, 2020.

Eligibility and Availability

Resident net metering customers of independently owned utilities (IOUs) can install renewable systems of 20 kW or less and nonresidential customers can install systems with a cap of the lesser of 100% of demand or 1 MW. Renewable systems are defined as solar photo-voltaic, solar thermal, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, tidal, wave, recycling, biomass, and combined heat and power and hydrogen fuel derived from renewable sources. These systems must be owned, leased, or operated by the customer-generator and must meet all interconnection, performance, safety, and reliability standards established by relevant authorities.

Cooperatives are required by S.B. 1189 to examine net metering policies but are not bound by law to implement new programs.

Net Excess Generation

The utility is responsible for maintaining an account of total electricity produced and consumed. When less electricity is produced than consumed in a month, then the customer-generator pays the difference. When more electricity is produced than consumed in a month, excess kilowatt-hour credits roll over to the next month. Utilities must annually pay out for any excess electric production at the avoided cost rate to zero-out electric bills and re-start the monthly carry-over process. Excess generation credits cannot be used to pay for non-volumetric charges.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      03/20/2015

    • Effective Date:
      03/20/2015

Contact

Memos

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    • 04/03/2015 by Ethan Case

      Entry clarified and updated.

  • 03/18/2015 by Ethan Case

    Settlement agreemet approved; more directive on future NEM tariffs available.

Net Metering in Virginia

Net Metering

Last Updated May 24, 2017

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Virginia

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, State Government, Agricultural, Multifamily Residential, Low Income Residential, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives

    • System Capacity Limit:

      Residential : 20 kW
      Non-Residentail : 1,000 kW
      Agricultural: 500 kW (aggregated capacity)
      Systems must be sized not to exceed customers annual load.

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      1% of utility’s adjusted Virginia peak-load forecast for the previous year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate. After 12-month cycle, customer may opt to roll over credit indefinitely or to receive payment at avoided-cost rate.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer owns RECs

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Allowed for agricultural customers for contiguous sites

Summary

Net metering in Virginia is available on a first-come, first-served basis until the rated generating capacity owned and operated by customer-generators reaches 1% of an electric distribution company’s adjusted Virginia peak-load forecast for the previous year. Net metering is available to customers of investor-owned utilities (including competitive suppliers) and electric cooperatives, but not to customers of municipal utilities.

Eligibility:

Virginia’s net-metering law applies to electric customers who generate electricity from renewable fuel sources* that are up to 20 kilowatts (kW) capacity for residential customers and 1,000 kW in capacity for non-residential customers. The generation systems must be located on the customer’s property and must be sized to primarily offset the customer’s electricity requirements. Systems installed after July 1, 2015 shall not exceed the expected annual energy consumption based on 12 month of billing history or annualized calculation if the billing history is not available.

Prospective net metering customers must receive approval to interconnect from their electric supplier prior to installation of the generation system. The electric distribution company must notify within 30 days if the customer meets the requirements for net metering. The net metering application is considered automatically approved if the electric company fails to notify within 30 days for residential customers and 60 days for non-residential customers.

Standby Charges:

HB 1983 that was passed in March 2011, requires that residential facilities with an AC capacity of greater than 10kW must pay a monthly standby charge. The amount of standby charge will be developed by the electric supplier and be approved by the Commission after it determines that the charge is reasonable to allow the supplier to recover portion of the infrastructure cost. The customers must also pay inspection fee of $50 for inverter based systems greater than 10 kW.

Any residential net-metering customer of Dominion Virginia Power who owns and operates, or contracts to own and operate, an electric generation system with a capacity greater than 10kW and less than 20kW is required to pay transmission and distribution standby charges. Customers will be required to pay $2.79 per kW in monthly distribution standby charges and $1.40 kW in monthly transmission standby charges. The SCC denied Dominion’s proposal for generation standby charges, but Dominion may reapply for approval for these charges in the future.

Net Excess Generation:

Net-metered energy is measured by a meter capable of gauging electricity flow in both directions. Monthly net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward to the next month. At the end of each 12-month period, the customer has the option of carrying forward eligible excess NEG to the next net metering 12-month period or selling the NEG to the utility. The amount of credit to be carried forward to a subsequent net metering period may not exceed the amount of energy purchased during the previous annual period.** In the case of selling the NEG to the utility, the customer must submit a written request to establish a power purchase agreement with the utility prior to the beginning of the net metering period to be covered by the power purchase agreement. The investor-owned utility must pay avoided cost (or higher if agreed upon). Net metering is also available to customers on time-of-use tariffs (with time-of-use applicable NEG calculations).

Meter aggregation

In 2013, HB 1695 created net metering programs for agricultural customers of investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Agricultural customers are allowed to aggregate their electric meters in a single account such that they are located at contiguous sites and served under an appropriate tariff. The aggregated generation capacity is limited to 500 kW for agricultural businesses.

Community Solar Pilot Program

S.B. 1393 enacted in March 2017, required the state’s two investor owned utilities- Dominion Virgina and Appalachian Power- to develop community solar pilot programs for their retail customers. The community solar projects must i) exclusively use solar ii) be placed in service on or after July 1, 2017, iii) not constructed by the utility, but acquired through a purchase agreement from a third party, and iv) sized no larger than 2 MW per project. The pilot program has a duration of three years. Appalachian Power must have program between 0.5 MW and 10 MW, while Dominion’s program must be between 10 MW and 40 MW.  The program design and the voluntary rate schedule for participants in the community solar programs will be approved by the Commission.

Renewable Attributes:

Customer-generators own all of the renewable energy credits (RECs) their system generates. Virginia’s net metering law states that at the time a customer enters into a power purchase agreement with the utility for net excess generation, the customer has a one-time option to sell RECs to the utility. This provision does not preclude the customer and utility (or other entity) from voluntarily entering into an agreement for the sale and purchase of RECs at any other time.

*According to the VA statutes § 56-576 renewable energy includes energy derived from sunlight, wind, falling water, biomass, sustainable or otherwise, energy from waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, wave motion, tides, and geothermal power. It also includes proportion of thermal or electric energy from a facility that results from co-firing of biomass 

 **For example, if a customer-generator bought 1,500 kilowatt-hours (kWh) from a utility during the first 11 months of the annual period, and then generated 2,000 kWh of excess electricity in the12th month, the customer could carry forward 1,500 kWh to the following month, and the remaining 500 kWh would be granted to the utility.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      1999 (subsequently amended)

    • Effective Date:
      7/1/2000

    • Date Enacted:
      2000 (subsequently amended)

    • Effective Date:
      5/25/2000

    • Date Enacted:
      04/13/2010

    • Effective Date:
      04/28/2010

    • Date Enacted:
      03/13/2013

    • Date Enacted:
      03/23/2015

    • Effective Date:
      07/01/2015

    • Date Enacted:
      03/16/2017

    • Effective Date:
      07/01/2017

Contact

Memos

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    • 05/24/2017 by Achyut Shrestha

      S.B. 1393 enacted in March 2017 requires Dominion Virginia Power and Appalachian Power to develop community solar pilot programs for its customers. The pilot program must be between 500kW – 10 MW for Appalachian Power and between 10 MW and 40 MW for Dominion.

    • 12/01/2015 by Achyut Shrestha

      On November 24, 2015 the VA State Corporation Commission (SCC) published its final version of the regulations pursuant to SB1395 which included several amendments to net metering regulation including: i) increased capacity limit of nonresidential customers in net metering program from 500 kW to 1MW, ii) eliminated authority for electric utilities allow higher capacity limit than 1 MW, iii) require the capacity of the generation system not to exceed the expected annual energy consumption based on the previous twelve month of billing history or annualized calculation if it is not available, iv) require customers to receive interconnection approval prior to installation of the system, and v) require the customers to pay for any additional cost incurred during interconnection.

    • 03/26/2015 by Achyut Shrestha

      HB 2267 was approved by Governor on 03/23/2015. Effective 7/1/2015 the netmetering cap for nonresidential customers have been increased from 500kW to 1MW.

  • 03/11/2015 by Achyut Shrestha

    SB 1395 approved by both Senate and the House, increases net-metering cap for non-residential customers to 1,000 kW. The Governor has until May 29 to take action, after which the bill automatically becomes law.

Net Metering in West Virginia

Net Metering

Last Updated March 16, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      West Virginia

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Combined Heat & Power, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Agricultural

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      IOUs with more than 30,000 customers: 2 MW for industrial; 500 kW for commercial; 25 kW for residential.
      IOUs with fewer than 30,000 customers, municipal utilities and co-ops: 50 kW for commercial and industrial; 25 kW for residential.

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      3% of peak demand during the previous year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate with no annual true-up (perpetual rollover)

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Allowed

Summary

Note: On March 12th, 2015 HB 2201 was signed by the Governor of West Virginia. Notably, the bill prohibits cross-subsidization of ratepayers potentially caused by net metering tariffs, requires the Public Utility Commission to investigate current and adopt new net metering and interconnection rules, and limits IOUs from allowing more than 3% of aggregate load to be generated by solar power.
 
Eligibility and Availability
Net metering in West Virginia is available to all retail electricity customers. System capacity limits vary depending on the customer type and electric utility type, according to the following table.
Customer Type IOUs with 30,000 customers or more IOUs with fewer than 30,000 customers, municipal utilities, electric cooperatives
Residential 25 kW 25 kW
Commercial 500 kW 50 kW
Industrial 2 MW 50 kW
Systems that generate electricity using “alternative” or “renewable energy” resources are eligible for net metering, including photovoltaics (PV), wind, geothermal, biomass, landfill gas, run of the river hydropower, biofuels, fuel cells, and combined heat and power (technically called “recycled energy” in the rules).
Net metering may be accomplished using a single, bi-directional meter or two meters. In the event that two meters are used, the net number of kWh for billing purposes will be determined by subtracting the amount of electricity flowing from the customer to the utility from the amount of electricity flowing from the utility to the customer. Net-metering tariffs must be identical in rate structure, retail-rate components, and monthly charges, to the tariff for which the customer would qualify if that customer were not a customer-generator. Customers on a time-of-use (TOU) tariff are permitted to net meter.
Each customer with a net-metered system up to 50 kW must carry a minimum of $100,000 in liability insurance. Customers with systems greater than 50 kW and up to 500 kW are required to carry a minimum of $500,000, and customers with systems greater than 500 kW must carry a minimum of $1 million in liability insurance.
Net Excess Generation
Net excess generation (NEG) may be carried over to a customer-generator’s next bill as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit at retail rate and may be rolled over, indefinitely. The credits may only be applied to the energy portion of the bill (not fixed costs or demand charges, for example).
Alternative Energy Credits
Based upon the Alternative and Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard, alternative energy credits can be generated by renewable OR non-renewable sources that are not net-metered.
General Order 184.32 states that in order to claim alternative energy credits, customer generators and behind the meter generators (BTMs) must certify their resource with the Public Utiliity Commission and then file an Alternative or Renewable Meter Generation. Customer generators and BTMs shall own alternative energy credits unless they have contracted by a third party to provide generation, in which case the third party owns the credits.
Customer generators and BTMs with systems above 10 kW must have meters that meet American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C-12 meter standards. Systems below 10 kW are permitted to make generation measurements based upon system inverters or may also have meters that meet ANSI C-12 standards.
Meter Aggregation
Customers may aggregate meters (either physically or virtually) and apply net metering credits earned on one meter to additional meters, as long as they are located within two miles of the point of generation. The associated costs of meter aggregation are the responsibility of the customer.
History
The West Virginia Public Service Commission (PSC) approved consensus filings regarding net metering and interconnection guidelines in December 2006. The approved consensus provisions include proposed rules that apply to all electric utilities in the state. Utility tariffs incorporating the consensus net-metering provisions took effect in March 2007. In June 2010, the PSC adopted new net metering and interconnection procedures. In May 2011,  the PSC clarified the definition of “run-of -river hydropower” to match the definition in the Alternative and Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      06/02/2009

    • Effective Date:
      07/01/2009

    • Date Enacted:
      06/30/2010

    • Effective Date:
      08/30/2010

    • Date Enacted:
      05/19/2011

    • Effective Date:
      07/18/2011

    • Date Enacted:
      03/12/2015

    • Effective Date:
      06/10/2015

Contact

  • General Information – PSC

  • Organization:

    West Virginia Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    201 Brooks Street
    Charleston, WV 25323

  • Phone:

    (800) 344-5113

Memos

Loading…

  • 03/16/2015 by Ethan Case

    HB 2201 passed. Stops net metering “cross subsidization,” mandates new NEM and interconnection study and rules, limits NEM to 3% of aggregated load, with 0.5% for residential customers.

Net Metering in North Carolina

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated September 19, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      North Carolina

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Tribal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      1 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; granted to utility at beginning of summer billing season

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Utility owns RECs (unless customer chooses to net meter under a time of use tariff with demand charges)

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) established net metering rules for the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power — in 2005. The NCUC subsequently amended the rules, most recently in 2009.

Eligibility and Availability 

Net metering is available to all customers who own and operate systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, ocean or wave energy, biomass resources, combined heat and power (CHP) which uses waste heat derived from eligible renewable resources, or hydrogen derived from eligible renewable resources.* Customers may net meter under any available rate schedule. However, customers that choose to take service under any tariff other than a time-of-use demand (TOUD) tariff must surrender to the utility all renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the customer’s generation – with no compensation for the customer.

The individual system capacity limit is one megawatt (MW). There is no aggregate capacity limit on net-metered systems. For residential systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) and non-residential systems up to 100 kW in capacity, utilities may not charge any standby charges or any additional metering charges other than those charged to customers who do not net meter under the applicable rate schedule. For larger systems, utilities are allowed to impose standby charges consistent with approved standby rates applicable to other customer-owned generation.

Net Excess Generation

In general, any customer net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried forward to the following billing period at the utility’s full retail rate, and then surrendered to the utility – with no compensation for the customer – at the beginning of each summer billing season. However, the treatment of generation and NEG for customers on TOU-demand tariffs is more complicated. For these customers, on-peak generation is used to offset on-peak consumption, and off-peak generation is used to offset off-peak consumption. Any remaining on-peak generation is then used to offset off-peak consumption. Off-peak generation may only be used to offset off-peak consumption.

Utilities must file with the NCUC annual reports indicating the number of net-metering applicants and customer-generators, the aggregate capacity of net-metered generation, the size and types of renewable-energy systems, the amounts of on-peak and off-peak generation credited and ultimately granted to the utility, and the reasons for any rejections or removals of customer-generators from a net-metering arrangement.

* In July 2006, the NCUC extended net metering to eligible systems with battery storage. “Gaming” a net-metering arrangement by using battery storage to manipulate a TOU tariff is not allowed.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      10/20/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      12/27/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      7/6/2006

    • Date Enacted:
      03/31/2009

    • Effective Date:
      06/01/2009

Contact

Memos

Loading…

  • 09/19/2015 by Brian Lips

    No policy changes.

    Blue Ridge EMC – Net Metering

    Last Updated December 17, 2015

    Program Overview

      • Implementing Sector:

        Utility

      • Category:

        Regulatory Policy

      • State:

        North Carolina

      • Incentive Type:

        Net Metering

      • Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp

      • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

        Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

      • Applicable Sectors:

        Residential

      • Applicable Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation

      • System Capacity Limit:

        25 kilowatts

      • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

        None

      • Net Excess Generation:

        Net excess generation is credited at the retail rate. However, the retail rate for net metering customers is lower than the retail rate for general residential customers. Credits roll over month-to month until May 31 of each year, when remaining credit is granted to the utility without customer compensation.

      • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

        Utility owns RECs

      • Meter Aggregation:

        Not allowed

    Summary

    The Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation offers net metering to its residential customers with solar photovoltaic, wind, or micro-hydro generators up to 25 kilowatts. There is no aggregate capacity limit.

    Net excess generation is credited at retail rate. However, net metering customers are not served on the general residential rate tariff; net metering customers have a lower retail energy rate and higher basic facilities charge than general residential customers. Net metering customers also have a higher minimum bill than general residential customers. Excess credit rolls over month-to-month, but is granted to the utility without compensation on May 31 of each year.

    Authorities

      • Date Enacted:
        04/30/2015

      • Effective Date:
        05/04/2015

    Contact

    Memos

    Loading…

    • 12/17/2015 by Autumn Proudlove

      Created program entry.

Net Metering in Georgia

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated September 1, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Georgia

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      10 kW for residential
      125% of demand for commercial

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      0.2% of utility’s peak demand during previous year

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at a predetermined rate filed with the PSC.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Note: On May 12, 2015 Georgia’s governor signed House Bill 57 which allows residential and commercial customers to enter into third party financing deals for solar systems.

Georgia Power does not offer a net energy metering tariff. Net energy metering tariffs filed by cooperatives are recorded in Docket # 31536 on the Georgia Public Service Commission’s website. Customers should contact their utility to see if it offers net metering.

The Georgia Cogeneration and Distributed Generation Act of 2001 allows but does not require net energy metering to be adopted by utilities. The law requires all utilities — investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives — to offer bidirectional or single directional metering to customer generators, depending on how the customer’s facility is connected to the grid. Eligible technologies include photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells and wind turbines up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity for residential applications, and systems up to 100 kW for commercial applications. The aggregate capacity of such systems is limited to 0.2% of a utility’s system peak demand from the previous year.

Systems connected on the customer’s side of the meter use a bi-directional meter, and any net excess generation (NEG) is credited to the customer’s next bill at a predetermined rate filed with the Georgia Public Service Commission (this is currently the Solar Avoided Cost for Georgia Power) . Alternatively, a customer may choose to sell all electricity from a system (rather than using the electricity generated by the system) by connecting ahead of the meter.

HB 57 allows residential and commercial customers to work with third parties to install, operate, lease, and/or finance solar systems. The limit for residential customers is 10 kW and the limit for commercial customers is 125% of the actual or expected peak demand of the premises. All systems must meet applicable safety, power quality, and interconnection requirements. Commercial systems above 100 kW and residential systems above 10 kW are not explicitly prohibited at this time but may be subject to additional compliance requirements.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      04/28/2001

    • Effective Date:
      06/01/2002

Contact

  • Organization:

    Georgia Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    244 Washington Street, S.W.
    Atlanta, GA 30334-5701

  • Phone:

    (404) 651-5958

  • E-Mail:

  • Organization:

    Georgia Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    244 Washington Street, SW
    Atlanta, GA 30334

  • Phone:

    (404) 463-4249

  • E-Mail:

Memos

Loading…

  • 09/01/2015 by Ethan Case

    Updated entry.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the cost per kW of CWC’s turbines compared to conventional power technology?

The CWC 36kW cost is $2013 per kW of power production capacity. According to the AWEA, the average cost for electricity production capacity in the USA is $6096 per kW —- 303% higher.

Who is CWC’s competition?

We are aware of 334 companies in the small wind turbine space. Most of them only produce very small turbines (under 10kW).  None of them price their electricity production capacity anywhere as low as Change Wind’s price ($2013 per kW,  i.e. $72,440 per turbine).

Is the CWC 36kW competitive with 3-blade horizontal axis turbines? 

Yes, very much so.  On a cost per kW basis, the CWC 36kW sells for 72% below the competition in small and medium turbines.  It pruduces electricity using turbulent air only 10 meters over the surface, cutting in at just 6 mph, and reaching optimal efficiency at 12 mph.  Since it captures wind from any direction it does not have to be mechanically turned into the wind direction.

Are there any service issues I should be concerned about?

The CWC 36kW comes with a 10 year warranty which can be extended an additional 10 years as long as the annual maintenance has been carried out. The turbine needs an inspection, oil change, lubrication, electronics check, and power wash every 100,000 kWh, approximately once each year, costing roughly $500 in most areas.

How is Change Wind able to price its turbines so low?  

Change Wind passes along to customers the benefit of high efficiency and low cost manufacturing.   Production is performed at a re-purposed New England wire factory building obtained at below market cost, with on-site hydro-electric power at 66% below market cost.  The company uses state-of-the-art CNC and robotic machinery, extracting its craftsmanship from the sophisticated machinery and tools, not from expensive workmen.

 

Are there tax incentives for on-site wind systems?

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, H.R. 1424, was enacted into law.  It includes a federal-level investment tax credit to help consumers purchase wind turbines for home, farm, or business use.  Owners of systems with 100 kW of capacity or less can receive a credit of 30% of the installed cost of the system.  It is available for equipment installed through December 31, 2016.  Source: http://energytaxincentives.org/business/renewables.php.