Net Metering in North Dakota

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Net Metering

Last Updated May 26, 2017

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      North Dakota

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      100 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Reconciled monthly at avoided cost rate*

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customers retain ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the customer’s load, while RECs associated with NEG convey to the utility

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Eligibility and Availability

North Dakota’s net metering policy, adopted in 1991 by the state Public Service Commission (PSC), applies to renewable energy systems and combined heat and power (CHP) systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity.* Net metering is available to all customers of investor-owned electric utilities; it is not available to customers of municipal utilities or electric cooperatives.

Net Excess Generation

If a customer has net excess generation (NEG) at the end of a monthly billing period, the utility must purchase the NEG at the utility’s avoided cost rate.

Aggregate Capacity Limit

There is no specified statewide limit on the aggregate capacity of all net-metered systems.

REC Ownership

Customers retain ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the customer’s load, while RECs associated with NEG convey to the utility (with compensation to the customer-generator).

Utilities may recover metering costs associated with production monitoring from a net-metered system.

* The North Dakota Legislative Council’s Committee on Administrative Rules has objected to the PSC’s provisions for net metering, asserting that the PSC violated legislative intent by establishing net metering. However, according to the PSC, net metering is currently available to qualifying customers in North Dakota.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      8/9/1991

    • Effective Date:
      5/1/1991

Contact

  • Organization:

    North Dakota Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    600 East Boulevard Avenue, Department 408
    Bismarck, ND 58505

  • Phone:

    (701) 328-1035

  • E-Mail:

Memos

Loading…

    • 05/26/2017 by Autumn Proudlove

      Annual review; no policy changes.

    • 05/10/2016 by Autumn Proudlove

      Annual review; no policy changes.

  • 04/27/2015 by Heather Calderwood

    No changes to program policy.

Net Metering in Idaho

Rocky Mountain Power – Net Metering

Last Updated October 27, 2016

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      Utility

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Idaho

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Utilities:

      PacifiCorp

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Rocky Mountain Power

    • System Capacity Limit:

      100 kW for non-residential; 25 kW for residential and small commercial

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      None

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate for residential and small commercial customers; credited at 85% of non-firm energy rate for all others

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has a net-metering tariff on file with the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities’ net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility’s original program: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, biomass or fuel cells; (2) limits net metering to 0.1% of its retail peak demand in a baseline year (2002 for Rocky Mountain Power); (3) limits residential systems to 25 kilowatts; and (4) restricts any single customer from generating more than 20% of such peak production.* Rocky Mountain Power’s net-metering tariff is Schedule 135.

In an April 2016 order, the PUC removed both the system-wide capacity cap of 0.1% of peak demand, and the individual capacity cap of 20% of the customer’s peak production. Rocky Mountain Power must submit annual reports to the PUC on net metering participation.

For residential and small commercial customers, net excess generation (NEG) is credited at Rocky Mountain Power’s retail rate and carried forward to the next month. For larger commercial and agricultural customers, NEG is credited at 85% of the monthly weighted average of the daily on-peak and off-peak Dow Jones Mid-C Index prices for non-firm energy and carried forward to the next month.

 

*Note: In 2013, Idaho Power made a request to the PUC to modify its net metering program, resulting in changes to the capacity cap and net excess generation. 

Contact

Memos

Loading…

  • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

    Annual review. Aggregate cap and individual cap based on peak load were removed in April.

    Avista Utilities – Net Metering

    Last Updated October 27, 2016

    Program Overview

      • Implementing Sector:

        Utility

      • Category:

        Regulatory Policy

      • State:

        Idaho

      • Incentive Type:

        Net Metering

      • Utilities:

        Avista Corp

      • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

        Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

      • Applicable Sectors:

        Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Federal Government, Agricultural

      • Applicable Utilities:

        Avista Utilities

      • System Capacity Limit:

        100 kW

      • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

        0.1% of Avista’s peak demand in 1996 (in Idaho)

      • Net Excess Generation:

        Credited to customer’s next bill; granted to utility at end of 12-month billing cycle

      • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

        Not addressed

      • Meter Aggregation:

        Not addressed

    Summary

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities’ net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility’s original program: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, biomass or fuel cells; (2) limits individual system size to 100 kilowatts (kW); (3) limits aggregate net-metered capacity to 0.1% of the utility’s peak demand in a baseline year (1996 for Avista); and (4) restricts any single customer from generating more than 20% of the aggregate capacity of all net-metered systems.* Avista Utilities’ net-metering tariff is Schedule 63. Previously, Avista had an individual system size cap of 25 kW. In July 2010, the PUC approved an increase in this cap to allow systems up to 100 kW to participate in net metering.

    For Avista Utilities customers, any net excess generation (NEG) during a monthly billing period is credited to the customer’s next bill at the utility’s retail rate. At the beginning of each calendar year, any remaining NEG is granted to the utility with no compensation for the customer.

     

    *Note: In 2013, Idaho Power made a request to the PUC to modify its net metering program, resulting in changes to the capacity cap and net excess generation. 

    Contact

    Memos

    Loading…

    • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

      Annual review. No changes to policy.

      Idaho Power – Net Metering

      Last Updated October 27, 2016

      Program Overview

        • Implementing Sector:

          Utility

        • Category:

          Regulatory Policy

        • State:

          Idaho

        • Incentive Type:

          Net Metering

        • Utilities:

          Idaho Power Co

        • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

          Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

        • Applicable Sectors:

          Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Federal Government, Agricultural

        • Applicable Utilities:

          Idaho Power

        • System Capacity Limit:

          25 kW for residential and small commercial
          100 kW for all others

        • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

          None

        • Net Excess Generation:

          Credited to customer’s next bill as a per kWh credit. Carried forward indefinitely.

        • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

          Customer

        • Meter Aggregation:

          Allowed

      Summary

      Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). Idaho Power’s net-metering tariff is Schedule 84. Systems owned or operated by residential and small general service customers must be 25 kW or smaller to participate in net metering. Large general service, large power service, and agriculture irrigation service customers may own or operate a system up to 100 kW to participate.

      In July 2013, the PUC issued an order in response to Idaho Power’s application to modify its net metering program. The ruling removed a previously existing service capacity cap of 2.9 MW and changed compensation for net excess generation to a kilowatt hour (kWh) credit that may be carried forward indefinitely. It also rejected Idaho Power’s proposal to move residential and small commercial customers to new service tariffs with increased monthly service charges and new basic load capacity charges. The net excess generation changes took effect in January of 2014.

      In a supplemental order issued in November, 2013, the PUC required Idaho Power to provide meter aggregation for net metered customers with multiple meters on the same property or property contiguous to the net metered system. To transfer credits between meters, all eligible meters must be on the same primary feeder, must be a similar rate class, and must be under the same name or financial responsibility. A meter aggregation fee of $10 applies.

      Under Idaho Power’s net-metering tariff, the customer is responsible for “all costs associated with any [utility] additions, modifications, or upgrades to any [utility] facilities that the [utility] determines are necessary as a result of the installation of the [generator] in order to maintain a safe, reliable electrical system.”

      Contact

      Memos

      Loading…

      • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

        Annual review. No changes to policy.

Net Metering in Colorado

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated August 27, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Colorado

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Low Income Residential, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities (except municipal utilities with less than 5,000 customers)

    • System Capacity Limit:

      IOU customers: 120% of the customer’s average annual consumption.
      Municipality and co-op customers: 25 kW for non-residential; 10 kW for residential.

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified
      Community solar gardens: 6 MW/yr for 2011-2013; set by PUC thereafter

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate. After 12-month cycle, IOU customers may opt to roll over credit indefinitely or to receive payment at IOU’s average hourly incremental cost. Municipality and co-ops provide annual reconciliation at a rate they deem appropriate.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer owns RECs

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Allowed for IOU customers
      Community solar gardens are allowed

Summary

Note: In March 2014, the Public Utilities Commission opened a miscellaneous proceeding (14M-0235E) to consider issues of retail renewable distributed generation and net metering. In August 2015, the Commission voted to maintain the current net metering rules and close the docket.

NET METERING

Eligibility and Availability

In December 2005 the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted standards for net metering and interconnection, as required by Amendment 37, a renewable energy ballot initiative approved by Colorado voters in November 2004.

Customer-generators are eligible for net metering in Colorado for retail renewable distributed generation. The following sections describe the rules that apply to investor-owned utilities (IOUs), with last section detailing net metering for municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. All utilities subject to the below net metering rules are required to provide net metering service at non-discriminatory rates to customer-generators.

Systems sized up to 120% of the customer’s annual average consumption that generate electricity using qualifying renewable energy resources are eligible for net metering in IOU service territories.

If a customer-generator does not own a single bi-directional meter, then the utility must provide one free of charge. Systems over 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity require a second meter to measure the output for the counting of renewable energy credits (RECs).

Net Excess Generation

Any customer’s net excess generation (NEG) in a given month is applied as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit to the customer’s next bill, with each kWh credit of NEG off-setting 1 kWh of electricity consumption in a future month. If in a calendar year a customer’s generation exceeds consumption, or if the customer-generator terminates its retail service, the utility must reimburse the customer for the NEG at the utility’s average hourly incremental cost over the most recent calendar year.

Net metering customers may make a one-time election in writing on or before the end of the calendar year to have their NEG carried forward from month-to-month indefinitely. If the customer chooses this option, they will surrender all their kWh credits when they terminate service with their utility.

Renewable Energy Credits

The customer-generator retains ownership of any RECs associated with the energy generated by the customer-generator’s system. A utility may acquire the RECs by purchasing them from the customer-generator through a standard offer. All contracts for RECs for solar electric technologies located on site at customer facilities are required to have a minimum term of 20 years if the system is under 100 kW.

Meter Aggregation

A single customer with multiple meters located on contiguous property may elect to have their generator offset the load measured at more than one meter, a policy commonly referred to as “meter aggregation.” A customer who wants to aggregate their meters under net metering must give the utility a 30-day notice and specify the order in which they want their kWh credits applied to the multiple meters. All affected meters must be on the same rate schedule.

Municipal Utilities and Electric Cooperatives

Colorado enacted legislation in March 2008 requiring municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all electric cooperatives to offer net metering for residential systems up to 10 kW and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW (see H.B. 1160). Electric cooperatives and municipal utilities are authorized to exceed these minimum size standards.

Any customer’s NEG in a given month is applied as a kWh credit to the customer’s next bill, with each kWh credit of NEG off-setting 1 kWh of electricity consumption in a future month. Electric cooperatives and municipal utilities are required to pay for any remaining NEG at the end of an annual period based on a “rate deemed appropriate” by the electric cooperative or municipal utility.

COMMUNITY SOLAR GARDENS

Eligibility and Availability

In 2010 Colorado enacted the Community Solar Gardens Act, allowing for the creation of “community solar gardens” (CSGs) with a nameplate capacity of up to 2 megawatts in the service territory of an IOU (see H.B. 1342). In 2015, Colorado enacted H.B. 15-1377, which specified that CSGs could be located in the service territory of an electric cooperative and used to comply with the retail distributed generation requirements of Colorado’s Renewable Energy Standard.

A CSG may be owned by the utility itself or any other for-profit or nonprofit entity or organization and must have at least 10 subscribers (or 4 subscribers if in the territory of an electric cooperative and the system size is less than 50 kW). The subscribers may purchase a portion (up to 40%) of the power produced by the array and receive kWh credits on their utility bills in proportion to the size of their subscription. CSG subscriptions must be for at least 1 kW (unless owned by a low-income CSG subscriber) and a supply no more than 120% of the subscriber’s annual electricity consumption.

Pursuant to H.B. 15-1284 enacted May 2015, subscribers must be located in the service territory of the same qualifying retail utility and also in the same county as, or a county adjacent to, that of the community solar garden.

Net Excess Generation

If, in a monthly billing period, the CSG subscriber’s billing credit associated with a CSG subscription exceeds the customer’s bill from the IOU, the excess billing credit will be rolled over as a credit from month-to-month indefinitely until the customer terminates service with the IOU, at which time any remaining billing credits expire.

Aggregate Cap

For compliance years 2011-2013, IOUs were only required to purchase up to 6 MW of new CSGs. For compliance years 2014 and thereafter, the PUC will set minimum and maximum purchases of renewable energy and RECs from new CSGs of different segments based on the capacity of the CSGs. Beginning in the 2015 compliance year, IOUs plan for acquisition of renewable energy from CSGs will be part of its renewable portfolio standard compliance plan. At least 5% of an IOU’s purchases from CSGs must be reserved for low-income CSG subscribers.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      12/15/2005

    • Effective Date:
      7/2/2006

    • Date Enacted:
      6/5/2010

    • Effective Date:
      6/5/2010

    • Date Enacted:
      05/08/2015

    • Effective Date:
      05/08/2015

    • Date Enacted:
      05/19/2015

    • Effective Date:
      08/05/2015

Contact

Memos

Loading…

    • 08/27/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      In August 2015, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission voted to maintain current net metering rules and close the docket examining the issue.

    • 08/25/2015 by Ben Inskeep

      In May 2015, Colorado enacted H.B. 15-1377, which specified that CSGs could be located in the service territory of an electric cooperative and used to comply with the retail distributed generation requirements of Colorado’s Renewable Energy Standard.

  • 06/01/2015 by Ben Inskeep

    Enacted May 2015, H.B. 15-1284 changed the definition of a community solar garden subscriber.

Net Metering in Alaska

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated December 16, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Alaska

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Ocean Thermal, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Utilities with annual retail sales of 5,000,000 kWh or more

    • System Capacity Limit:

      25 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      1.5% of average retail demand

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at non-firm power rate; carries over indefinitely

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

In October 2009, the Regulatory Commission of Alaska (RCA) approved net metering regulations. These rules were finalized and approved by the lieutenant governor in January 2010 and became effective January 15, 2010. All electric utilities subject to economic regulation are required to offer net metering. Independent systems with retail sales of less than 5,000,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) are exempt from offering net metering. Utilities that generate 100% of electricity from certain approved renewable energy sources and other sources approved by the RCA that have a low environmental impact are also exempt.

With these regulations, renewable energy systems with a capacity up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are eligible for net metering. Overall enrollment is limited to 1.5% of a utility’s retail sales from the previous year. Utilities may require additional metering equipment, but the utilities are responsible for all costs associated with installing and maintaining this additional equipment.

Net excess generation is reconciled monthly, with the utility crediting the customer-generator’s account for the excess kWh generation multiplied by the “non-firm power rate.” These dollar amount credits do not expire and can be applied to subsequent monthly bills. Utilities cannot charge customer-generators additional standby, capacity, interconnection, or other charges unless approved by the RCA.

Authorities

    • Effective Date:
      01/15/2010

    • Effective Date:
      06/16/2010

Contact

Memos

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  • 12/16/2015 by Kate Daniel

    Annual review. No policy changes.

Net Metering in Montana

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated September 14, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Montana

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Utilities:

      NorthWestern Corporation

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Hydroelectric, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      50 kW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; granted to utility at end of 12-month period

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Montana’s net-metering law, enacted in July 1999, applies to all customers of investor-owned utilities. Systems up to 50 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind or hydropower are eligible. No limit on enrollment or statewide installed capacity is specified. Utilities may not require customer-generators to comply with any additional standards or requirements beyond those established by the National Electric Code, National Electrical Safety Code, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

Net excess generation (NEG) is credited to the customer’s next monthly bill. The customer may choose to start the net metering period at the beginning of January, April, July or October to match seasonal farming cycles. At the beginning of the year — either in January, April, July or October, depending on the customer’s choice — any remaining unused kilowatt-hour (kWh) credits accumulated during the previous year are granted to the utility.

Montana’s electric cooperative utilities developed a draft net-metering agreement in 2001; this agreement has been adopted by most of the state’s cooperatives. Contact your electric cooperative to find out if net metering is available.

The Legislature passed a joint resolution in April 2015 to conduct a study on the costs and benefits of net metering, noting it is necessary to determine such impacts before moving forward with changes to the state net metering program. The Energy and Telecommunications Interim Committee reviewed net metering issues, prepared a draft report to the legislature, and has drafted several proposed bills to implement changes to the state’s net metering policy to be reviewed by the full legislature in the next session. Committee materials, including the draft bills, may be found here.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      1999

    • Date Enacted:
      04/27/2015

Contact

  • Organization:

    Montana Public Service Commission

  • Address:

    1701 Prospect Avenue
    Helena, MT 59620-2601

  • Phone:

    (406) 444-6359

  • E-Mail:

Loading…

    • 09/14/2016 by Kate Daniel

      Annual review. The legislative Energy and Telecommunications Interim Committee reviewed net metering policy in Montana to recommend possible changes to the policy.

  • 05/21/2015 by Kate Daniel

    Annual review. Legislature passed resolution to study the costs and benefits of net metering

Net Metering in Nevada

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated October 28, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Nevada

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Residential

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      The lesser of 1 MW or 100% of the customer’s annual requirements for electricity

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      None

    • Net Excess Generation:

      All exported generation is credited at the avoided cost rate. Any credits that exceed the customer’s monthly bill will be carried over to the next billing period. Remaining credits at the end of the year will be paid to the customer.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Customer owns RECs (unless utility subsidizes system)

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed for most technologies.
      Meter aggregation allowed for hydro installations across contiguous properties owned by the customer generator.
      Meter aggregation allowed for very specific wind projects. See below.

Summary

Note:  In accordance with SB 374 of 2015, The Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUCN) has approved new net metering tariffs effective January 1, 2016. The billing calculation described in NV Energy’s new tariffs does not meet DSIRE’s definition of net metering, as exported generation does not offset a customer’s consumption on a one-to-one basis within the same billing cycle. Rather, exports are credited at the avoided cost rate. In a September 2016 order to approve a settlement agreement, the PUCN restored the original net metering rates to customers who had installed a net metering system as of December 31, 2015.

Nevada’s original net-metering law for renewable-energy systems was enacted in 1997 and amended in 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2011, 2013, and 2015. Systems up to one megawatt (MW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and certain types of hydropower are generally eligible, although systems greater than 25 kilowatts (kW) in capacity may be subject to certain costs at the utility’s discretion. Systems must be designed to offset part or all of a customer-generator’s electricity requirements. A system is not eligible for net metering if its generating capacity exceeds the greater of (1) the limit on demand that the class of customer of the customer-generator may place on the utility’s system, or (2) 100% of the customer’s annual electricity demand.

Senate Bill 374 of 2015 changed the aggregate capacity limit for net metering under current tariffs from 3% of total peak capacity for all utilities to a flat cap of 235 MW. Once that cap was reached, (which occurred in August 2015) the utilities must develop a new net metering tariff to be approved by the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUCN). Such tariffs were approved in December 2015 and made effective January 1, 2016; there is no aggregate capacity limit under the new tariffs.

Separate Customer Class and New Tariff
Senate Bill 374 allowed the PUCN to establish a separate customer class for distributed generation customers. The post-2015 net metering tariffs reflect this new customer class, with a higher monthly service charge and lower per-kilowatt hour (kWh) energy charge. The bill also gave the PUCN broad authority to approve new tariffs that address cost shifts from net metered customers to other ratepayers. Such tariffs may vary from the previous requirements for billing, measurement, and treatment of net excess generation.

Metering
For net-metered systems up to 25 kW, utilities must offer the customer-generator a meter capable of registering the flow of electricity in two directions. The utility may also install one or more additional meters to measure the flow of electricity in each direction, but at its own expense and with the written permission of the customer. For net-metered systems greater than 25 kW, the utility may require a customer-generator to install — at its own cost — a meter capable of measuring generation output and customer load. In addition, a utility may require a customer-generator to pay for any upgrades to the utility’s system, excluding standby charges, that are required to make the customer’s system compatible with the utility’s system.

Net Excess Generation
The new net metering tariffs do not meet DSIRE’s definition of net metering, in which exported energy offsets, on a one-to-one basis, electricity consumed by the customer at a different time during the same billing cycle. NV energy will measure the energy exported to the grid from the customer’s system (after the customer has consumed their own usage from the generation at the same time). NV Energy will assign a credit to the energy exported to the grid valued at the utility’s avoided cost rate. If the customer is on a time-of-use rate, the credit will be calculated based on the time period in which the energy was exported. The monthly bill will apply the value of those credits against the energy charges for the total amount of energy delivered by the utility.

Meter Aggregation
Assembly Bill 359 allows owners of hydropower facilities with a generating capacity up to 1 MW to offset electricity consumed on multiple contiguous properties owned by the customer generator. Assembly Bill 359 also allows for meter aggregation in the case of a wind energy device installed during 2012 on property owned or leased by an institution of higher learning and used for research and workforce training.

History

Assembly Bill 428, enacted in June 2013, required the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUCN) to open an investigation to evaluate the costs and benefits of net energy metering, and then recommend a methodology for allocating such costs and benefits appropriately. The PUCN opened Docket 13-07010 for this process and commissioned a study by E3, which is available in that docket and on the PUCN’s website. On September 26, 2014, the PUCN submitted its net metering report to the Legislature, in which it recommended the Legislature modify the existing net metering statutes to provide the PUCN more flexibility to address net metering issues in general rate cases. The PUCN has also opened an investigation in Docket 14-06009 on whether to create separate customer classes for net metering customers. The cost of service studies generated in this docket were used in determining the new net metering tariffs effective after the 235 MW cap was reached. In 2016, the legislature commissioned an update to the E3 study to reevaluate any cost shift under the original net metering rates and if net metering customers were grandfathered under the new regime.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      7/1/1997

    • Expiration Date:
      None

    • Date Enacted:
      2004

    • Effective Date:
      2004

    • Date Enacted:
      06/05/2015

    • Effective Date:
      06/05/2015

    • Date Enacted:
      12/23/2015

    • Effective Date:
      01/01/2016

Contact

  • Organization:

    Public Utilities Commission of Nevada

  • Address:

    1150 E. William Street
    Carson City, NV 89701

  • Phone:

    (775) 684-6165

  • E-Mail:

Memos

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    • 10/28/2016 by Kate Daniel

      In September, the PUCN restored the original net metering rates for customers with a system installed as of December 31, 2015.

    • 01/14/2016 by Kate Daniel

      Added clarifying notes.

    • 01/08/2016 by Kate Daniel

      New net metering tariffs stipulated by SB 374 have been approved by the Public Utilities Commission and are effective as of January 1, 2016 for all net metering customers.

  • 06/12/2015 by Brian Lips

    Updated with details from SB 374. Aggregate capacity limit has been changed. Bill also lays the groundwork for new net metering tariffs.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the cost per kW of CWC’s turbines compared to conventional power technology?

The CWC 36kW cost is $2013 per kW of power production capacity. According to the AWEA, the average cost for electricity production capacity in the USA is $6096 per kW —- 303% higher.

Who is CWC’s competition?

We are aware of 334 companies in the small wind turbine space. Most of them only produce very small turbines (under 10kW).  None of them price their electricity production capacity anywhere as low as Change Wind’s price ($2013 per kW,  i.e. $72,440 per turbine).

Is the CWC 36kW competitive with 3-blade horizontal axis turbines? 

Yes, very much so.  On a cost per kW basis, the CWC 36kW sells for 72% below the competition in small and medium turbines.  It pruduces electricity using turbulent air only 10 meters over the surface, cutting in at just 6 mph, and reaching optimal efficiency at 12 mph.  Since it captures wind from any direction it does not have to be mechanically turned into the wind direction.

Are there any service issues I should be concerned about?

The CWC 36kW comes with a 10 year warranty which can be extended an additional 10 years as long as the annual maintenance has been carried out. The turbine needs an inspection, oil change, lubrication, electronics check, and power wash every 100,000 kWh, approximately once each year, costing roughly $500 in most areas.

How is Change Wind able to price its turbines so low?  

Change Wind passes along to customers the benefit of high efficiency and low cost manufacturing.   Production is performed at a re-purposed New England wire factory building obtained at below market cost, with on-site hydro-electric power at 66% below market cost.  The company uses state-of-the-art CNC and robotic machinery, extracting its craftsmanship from the sophisticated machinery and tools, not from expensive workmen.

 

Are there tax incentives for on-site wind systems?

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, H.R. 1424, was enacted into law.  It includes a federal-level investment tax credit to help consumers purchase wind turbines for home, farm, or business use.  Owners of systems with 100 kW of capacity or less can receive a credit of 30% of the installed cost of the system.  It is available for equipment installed through December 31, 2016.  Source: http://energytaxincentives.org/business/renewables.php.