Net Metering in South Carolina

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated January 25, 2016

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      South Carolina

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Combined Heat & Power, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Investor-Owned Utility, Nonprofit, Municipal Utilities, Residential, Cooperative Utilities, Schools, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      All utilities with more than 100,00 customers, excluding cooperatives.

    • System Capacity Limit:

      20 kW for residential; 1000 kW for non-residential

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      2% of average retail peak demand for previous 5 years

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill on a monthly basis. Annual pay out to customer at the avoided cost rate zeros out monthly carry-over.

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Explicitly prohibited

Summary

In April of 2014 the South Carolina legislature unanimously passed S.B. 1189 to create a voluntary Distributed Energy Resource Program. In March 2015 the Public Utilities Commission approved a settlement agreement among  solar stakeholders detailing how the new net metering mandates laid out in S.B. 1189 would be fulfilled.

The settlement agreement approved by the Public Service Commission stipulates that utilities will offer net energy metering at the full retail rate.. Additionally, no new charges or fees distinctly separate from new net metering rates will be imposed upon customer generators until the expiration of the agreement on January 1, 2021.

The settlement agreement also stipulates that utility-specific distributed energy resources net metering incentive (DER NEM incentive) will be applied to customer-generators receiving service under new net metering tariffs prior to January 1, 2021. Customer-generators whose net energy metering facilities were operational prior to the availability of net energy metering rates approved by the commission under the terms of the settlement agreement may remain in historic net energy metering programs through December 31, 2020.

Eligibility and Availability

Resident net metering customers of independently owned utilities (IOUs) can install renewable systems of 20 kW or less and nonresidential customers can install systems with a cap of the lesser of 100% of demand or 1 MW. Renewable systems are defined as solar photo-voltaic, solar thermal, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, tidal, wave, recycling, biomass, and combined heat and power and hydrogen fuel derived from renewable sources. These systems must be owned, leased, or operated by the customer-generator and must meet all interconnection, performance, safety, and reliability standards established by relevant authorities.

Cooperatives are required by S.B. 1189 to examine net metering policies but are not bound by law to implement new programs.

Net Excess Generation

The utility is responsible for maintaining an account of total electricity produced and consumed. When less electricity is produced than consumed in a month, then the customer-generator pays the difference. When more electricity is produced than consumed in a month, excess kilowatt-hour credits roll over to the next month. Utilities must annually pay out for any excess electric production at the avoided cost rate to zero-out electric bills and re-start the monthly carry-over process. Excess generation credits cannot be used to pay for non-volumetric charges.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      03/20/2015

    • Effective Date:
      03/20/2015

Contact

Memos

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    • 04/03/2015 by Ethan Case

      Entry clarified and updated.

  • 03/18/2015 by Ethan Case

    Settlement agreemet approved; more directive on future NEM tariffs available.

Net Metering in North Carolina

Net Metering

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Last Updated September 19, 2015

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      State

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      North Carolina

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Hydrogen, Landfill Gas, Tidal, Wave, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Tribal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Investor-owned utilities

    • System Capacity Limit:

      1 MW

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      No limit specified

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate; granted to utility at beginning of summer billing season

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Utility owns RECs (unless customer chooses to net meter under a time of use tariff with demand charges)

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) established net metering rules for the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power — in 2005. The NCUC subsequently amended the rules, most recently in 2009.

Eligibility and Availability 

Net metering is available to all customers who own and operate systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, ocean or wave energy, biomass resources, combined heat and power (CHP) which uses waste heat derived from eligible renewable resources, or hydrogen derived from eligible renewable resources.* Customers may net meter under any available rate schedule. However, customers that choose to take service under any tariff other than a time-of-use demand (TOUD) tariff must surrender to the utility all renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the customer’s generation – with no compensation for the customer.

The individual system capacity limit is one megawatt (MW). There is no aggregate capacity limit on net-metered systems. For residential systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) and non-residential systems up to 100 kW in capacity, utilities may not charge any standby charges or any additional metering charges other than those charged to customers who do not net meter under the applicable rate schedule. For larger systems, utilities are allowed to impose standby charges consistent with approved standby rates applicable to other customer-owned generation.

Net Excess Generation

In general, any customer net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried forward to the following billing period at the utility’s full retail rate, and then surrendered to the utility – with no compensation for the customer – at the beginning of each summer billing season. However, the treatment of generation and NEG for customers on TOU-demand tariffs is more complicated. For these customers, on-peak generation is used to offset on-peak consumption, and off-peak generation is used to offset off-peak consumption. Any remaining on-peak generation is then used to offset off-peak consumption. Off-peak generation may only be used to offset off-peak consumption.

Utilities must file with the NCUC annual reports indicating the number of net-metering applicants and customer-generators, the aggregate capacity of net-metered generation, the size and types of renewable-energy systems, the amounts of on-peak and off-peak generation credited and ultimately granted to the utility, and the reasons for any rejections or removals of customer-generators from a net-metering arrangement.

* In July 2006, the NCUC extended net metering to eligible systems with battery storage. “Gaming” a net-metering arrangement by using battery storage to manipulate a TOU tariff is not allowed.

Authorities

    • Date Enacted:
      10/20/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      12/27/2005

    • Date Enacted:
      7/6/2006

    • Date Enacted:
      03/31/2009

    • Effective Date:
      06/01/2009

Contact

Memos

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  • 09/19/2015 by Brian Lips

    No policy changes.

    Blue Ridge EMC – Net Metering

    Last Updated December 17, 2015

    Program Overview

      • Implementing Sector:

        Utility

      • Category:

        Regulatory Policy

      • State:

        North Carolina

      • Incentive Type:

        Net Metering

      • Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp

      • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

        Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small)

      • Applicable Sectors:

        Residential

      • Applicable Utilities:

        Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation

      • System Capacity Limit:

        25 kilowatts

      • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

        None

      • Net Excess Generation:

        Net excess generation is credited at the retail rate. However, the retail rate for net metering customers is lower than the retail rate for general residential customers. Credits roll over month-to month until May 31 of each year, when remaining credit is granted to the utility without customer compensation.

      • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

        Utility owns RECs

      • Meter Aggregation:

        Not allowed

    Summary

    The Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation offers net metering to its residential customers with solar photovoltaic, wind, or micro-hydro generators up to 25 kilowatts. There is no aggregate capacity limit.

    Net excess generation is credited at retail rate. However, net metering customers are not served on the general residential rate tariff; net metering customers have a lower retail energy rate and higher basic facilities charge than general residential customers. Net metering customers also have a higher minimum bill than general residential customers. Excess credit rolls over month-to-month, but is granted to the utility without compensation on May 31 of each year.

    Authorities

      • Date Enacted:
        04/30/2015

      • Effective Date:
        05/04/2015

    Contact

    Memos

    Loading…

    • 12/17/2015 by Autumn Proudlove

      Created program entry.

36KW Wind Turbine, Power Produced Each Month

The charts below gives a rough estimate of the power produced each month by Change Wind Corporations 36KW Helical Wind Turbine, and by a rough estimate I mean, the wind changes daily and your not going to get a wind to blow steadily at 10mph for a whole month.

 The main reason for the chart is to show how much electricity can be produced each month which is a lot, and that’s in the present time, what will it be 5 years from now or 10-20 years from now.

The cost per kilo watt hour has risen 30% or more in much of the USA over the past 10 years, some places a lot more then 30% and costs will continue to rise as coal mines are shut down and demand continues to rise.

Take the numbers from the chart and add about 50% more to that total and that’s the amount of power Change Winds 36KW wind turbine will produce 10-15 years from now.