Net Metering in Idaho

Rocky Mountain Power – Net Metering

Last Updated October 27, 2016

Only 30 ft tall kicks in at 6mph and at 12mph produces 36kw enough to power 30 average homes

Program Overview

    • Implementing Sector:

      Utility

    • Category:

      Regulatory Policy

    • State:

      Idaho

    • Incentive Type:

      Net Metering

    • Utilities:

      PacifiCorp

    • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

      Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

    • Applicable Sectors:

      Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

    • Applicable Utilities:

      Rocky Mountain Power

    • System Capacity Limit:

      100 kW for non-residential; 25 kW for residential and small commercial

    • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

      None

    • Net Excess Generation:

      Credited to customer’s next bill at retail rate for residential and small commercial customers; credited at 85% of non-firm energy rate for all others

    • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

      Not addressed

    • Meter Aggregation:

      Not addressed

Summary

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has a net-metering tariff on file with the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities’ net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility’s original program: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, biomass or fuel cells; (2) limits net metering to 0.1% of its retail peak demand in a baseline year (2002 for Rocky Mountain Power); (3) limits residential systems to 25 kilowatts; and (4) restricts any single customer from generating more than 20% of such peak production.* Rocky Mountain Power’s net-metering tariff is Schedule 135.

In an April 2016 order, the PUC removed both the system-wide capacity cap of 0.1% of peak demand, and the individual capacity cap of 20% of the customer’s peak production. Rocky Mountain Power must submit annual reports to the PUC on net metering participation.

For residential and small commercial customers, net excess generation (NEG) is credited at Rocky Mountain Power’s retail rate and carried forward to the next month. For larger commercial and agricultural customers, NEG is credited at 85% of the monthly weighted average of the daily on-peak and off-peak Dow Jones Mid-C Index prices for non-firm energy and carried forward to the next month.

 

*Note: In 2013, Idaho Power made a request to the PUC to modify its net metering program, resulting in changes to the capacity cap and net excess generation. 

Contact

Memos

Loading…

  • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

    Annual review. Aggregate cap and individual cap based on peak load were removed in April.

    Avista Utilities – Net Metering

    Last Updated October 27, 2016

    Program Overview

      • Implementing Sector:

        Utility

      • Category:

        Regulatory Policy

      • State:

        Idaho

      • Incentive Type:

        Net Metering

      • Utilities:

        Avista Corp

      • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

        Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

      • Applicable Sectors:

        Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Federal Government, Agricultural

      • Applicable Utilities:

        Avista Utilities

      • System Capacity Limit:

        100 kW

      • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

        0.1% of Avista’s peak demand in 1996 (in Idaho)

      • Net Excess Generation:

        Credited to customer’s next bill; granted to utility at end of 12-month billing cycle

      • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

        Not addressed

      • Meter Aggregation:

        Not addressed

    Summary

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities’ net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility’s original program: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, biomass or fuel cells; (2) limits individual system size to 100 kilowatts (kW); (3) limits aggregate net-metered capacity to 0.1% of the utility’s peak demand in a baseline year (1996 for Avista); and (4) restricts any single customer from generating more than 20% of the aggregate capacity of all net-metered systems.* Avista Utilities’ net-metering tariff is Schedule 63. Previously, Avista had an individual system size cap of 25 kW. In July 2010, the PUC approved an increase in this cap to allow systems up to 100 kW to participate in net metering.

    For Avista Utilities customers, any net excess generation (NEG) during a monthly billing period is credited to the customer’s next bill at the utility’s retail rate. At the beginning of each calendar year, any remaining NEG is granted to the utility with no compensation for the customer.

     

    *Note: In 2013, Idaho Power made a request to the PUC to modify its net metering program, resulting in changes to the capacity cap and net excess generation. 

    Contact

    Memos

    Loading…

    • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

      Annual review. No changes to policy.

      Idaho Power – Net Metering

      Last Updated October 27, 2016

      Program Overview

        • Implementing Sector:

          Utility

        • Category:

          Regulatory Policy

        • State:

          Idaho

        • Incentive Type:

          Net Metering

        • Utilities:

          Idaho Power Co

        • Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies:

          Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

        • Applicable Sectors:

          Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Federal Government, Agricultural

        • Applicable Utilities:

          Idaho Power

        • System Capacity Limit:

          25 kW for residential and small commercial
          100 kW for all others

        • Aggregate Capacity Limit:

          None

        • Net Excess Generation:

          Credited to customer’s next bill as a per kWh credit. Carried forward indefinitely.

        • Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits:

          Customer

        • Meter Aggregation:

          Allowed

      Summary

      Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state’s three investor-owned utilities — Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power — has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). Idaho Power’s net-metering tariff is Schedule 84. Systems owned or operated by residential and small general service customers must be 25 kW or smaller to participate in net metering. Large general service, large power service, and agriculture irrigation service customers may own or operate a system up to 100 kW to participate.

      In July 2013, the PUC issued an order in response to Idaho Power’s application to modify its net metering program. The ruling removed a previously existing service capacity cap of 2.9 MW and changed compensation for net excess generation to a kilowatt hour (kWh) credit that may be carried forward indefinitely. It also rejected Idaho Power’s proposal to move residential and small commercial customers to new service tariffs with increased monthly service charges and new basic load capacity charges. The net excess generation changes took effect in January of 2014.

      In a supplemental order issued in November, 2013, the PUC required Idaho Power to provide meter aggregation for net metered customers with multiple meters on the same property or property contiguous to the net metered system. To transfer credits between meters, all eligible meters must be on the same primary feeder, must be a similar rate class, and must be under the same name or financial responsibility. A meter aggregation fee of $10 applies.

      Under Idaho Power’s net-metering tariff, the customer is responsible for “all costs associated with any [utility] additions, modifications, or upgrades to any [utility] facilities that the [utility] determines are necessary as a result of the installation of the [generator] in order to maintain a safe, reliable electrical system.”

      Contact

      Memos

      Loading…

      • 10/27/2016 by Kate Daniel

        Annual review. No changes to policy.

36KW Wind Turbine, Power Produced Each Month

The charts below gives a rough estimate of the power produced each month by Change Wind Corporations 36KW Helical Wind Turbine, and by a rough estimate I mean, the wind changes daily and your not going to get a wind to blow steadily at 10mph for a whole month.

 The main reason for the chart is to show how much electricity can be produced each month which is a lot, and that’s in the present time, what will it be 5 years from now or 10-20 years from now.

The cost per kilo watt hour has risen 30% or more in much of the USA over the past 10 years, some places a lot more then 30% and costs will continue to rise as coal mines are shut down and demand continues to rise.

Take the numbers from the chart and add about 50% more to that total and that’s the amount of power Change Winds 36KW wind turbine will produce 10-15 years from now.